Academy Finance Expert Makes the ‘WSJ’

Eileen Sharkey is teaching “Financial Literacy for the 21st Century” on Wednesdays, 1:30pm – 3:00pm beginning 4/4. Click here to register
She was featured in the Wall Street Journal. Read full text below, or click on the link here, Sharkey in Wall Street Journal

Europe Might Be No Investing Vacation

European Markets Won’t Benefit From Stimulus Right Away, She Says

By Shefali Anand

Published in 2010.

With a rebound in Europe’s economies looking unlikely this year, Denver financial adviser Eileen Sharkey has this to say about international investments: Proceed with caution.

The European Central Bank in late January announced plans to pump more than $1 trillion in new money into eurozone economies to help spur growth, similar to what the U.S. Federal Reserve did in the U.S. amid the financial crisis. But it could take years for the flood of money to help some economies and their stock markets, Ms. Sharkey says.

Eileen Sharkey.
Eileen Sharkey. Photo: Edward DeCroce
Joel Javer.
Joel Javer. Photo: Edward DeCroce

“Things that are in trouble are generally cheap and attractive, but it may take a while for the dust to settle,” says Ms. Sharkey, co-founder of financial advisers Sharkey, Howes & Javer Inc.

The firm’s investment team is closely monitoring investments in the region, and if there are signs of declines, it would look to cut its international stock allocation by as much as half. Last year, the advisers bought an international fund that hedges against foreign-currency risk and thus loses less value as the U.S. dollar strengthens. “We believe the dollar will continue to get stronger” this year, says Joel Javer, co-founder of the firm.

In this column we feature model portfolios from prominent investment advisers. Ms. Sharkey co-founded the firm in 1990 with Lawrence Howes, as well as Mr. Javer. The firm currently manages around $750 million.

For clients who can handle moderate risk, the firm allocates 12% to developed foreign stocks, which include investments outside Europe such as Japan. If technical trends indicate that their international fund is poised to lose value, they would look to trim it, says Mr. Javer.

Here, the advisers share a model portfolio suitable for clients who can handle moderate risk.

The portfolio’s weighted average expense ratio is 0.56%, and the portfolio was up 12% annually for the five years endedDec. 31, according to Mr. Javer. That was before the firm’s investment-management fee, which is 1% or less of assets under management.

Ms. Anand is markets and finance editor for The Wall Street Journal in India. Email her at shefali.anand@wsj.com.

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Immigration Lawyer Explains the Law

Course leader Hans Meyer, IMMIGRATION ISSUES IN THE TRUMP ERA,  is the founder of the Meyer Law Office, P.C.  His practice specializes in immigration law and removal defense, criminal defense and postconviction relief, the immigration consequences of crimes, and the civil rights of immigrants.  Recently he’s been in the news regarding several cases surrounding deportation from Colorado. (See one such article below.)
His five-week course, Wednesdays, beginning 2/21 at 1:30, will begin with the development of immigration law and an examination of the terminology and structure of our current immigration system. Other classes will examine: the immigration policy positions of the last decade; immigration enforcement and legislative proposals of the prior and current administrations; the creation and end of the Deferred Action (DACA) program; and recent efforts at significant enforcement at the state and local levels. Finally, we will examine responses to enforcement models by immigrant communities and advocates, including sanctuary city policies and comprehensive reform efforts.

Hans advocates for the statutory and constitutional rights of immigrants before various immigration agencies and state and federal courts, often against governmental and institutional abuses of power.  He is a former trial attorney with the Colorado State Public Defender, where he became an expert in the field of crimmigration law and developed a statewide immigration advisement system for indigent noncitizen defendants.  Hans also served as the former Director of Public Policy for the Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition, where he focused on local, state, and national immigration policy.

As a nationally recognized expert, Hans frequently lectures, publishes, and appears in the press on issues related to immigration law and the criminal justice system.  He also serves as an expert on immigration consequences for the Alternate Defense Counsel throughout Colorado.  Hans has been honored for his public interest litigation and advocacy by the Colorado Criminal Defense Bar (CCDB), the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), and the Colorado Hispanic Bar, among other organizations.   He is an active member of AILA, CCDB, National Immigration Project, National Lawyers Guild, the ACLU of Colorado, and the Colorado Hispanic Bar Association, and serves on the board of directors for several nonprofit organizations, including the CCDB and the Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition. Hans grew up in Aurora, Colorado, and is a 2006 graduate of the evening program at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law.  Prior to his career as an attorney, Hans was a forest firefighter, construction worker, and Outward Bound instructor.  He also spent several years living, working and traveling in Latin America, focusing primarily on human rights issues in Guatemala and Chiapas, Mexico.

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April 17, 19 MEMBER BENEFIT PRESENTATIONS

Free, Fun & Food member benefit logo

THE SILENT EPIDEMIC: ESTRANGEMENT FROM FAMILY MEMBERS
Course Leader: Tina Gilbertson
TUES, 4/17, 9:30-11 am,
Lecture, practical tools

About one in five people has someone in the family they’re not talking to. For those over 50, perhaps the most painful silence is when an adult child intentionally creates distance. Parents who are rejected or ignored by their adult children may feel like they’re the only ones with this painful problem. Research-based information and practical tips will be presented. Find out what causes estrangement, what to do about it, and how to support friends and relatives who may find themselves estranged from one or more adult children. Tina Gilbertson is a Denver-based psychotherapist specializing in family estrangement. Tina has been featured as an expert in communication and relationships by the Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Redbook, and hundreds of other media outlets. She maintains a blog on PsychologyToday.com.

YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU
Performance by cast of Readers Theatre course
** TUES, 4/17, 1:00 – 3:00 pm, ENCORE, 4/24, 1:00 – 3:00 pm,

The cast of the Readers Theatre course presents “You Can’t Take It With You,” a Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Moss Hart and George S. Kauffman. Join us.

DAM RENOVATIONS
Course Leader: Cristoph Heinrich, Director, Denver Art Museum
THURSDAY, 4/19 11:30 am -1 pm,
LECTURE AT THE ACADEMY

Learn about the exciting new concepts and changes to be included in the newly renovated Hamilton building at the Denver Art Museum. The DAM Director will talk about the expansion of the North building and how the change will happen to one of Denver’s crown jewels in art and culture.

Click Here for Special Event Flier

All special events take place at The Academy, (6500 E. Girard Ave., Denver 80224 – inside Calvary Baptist Church)

NO RSVP NECESSARY- MEMBERS MAY BRING ONE FRIEND

IT’s ALL FREE!

INFO@ACADEMYLL.ORG
(303) 770-0786 (Messages only)

 

 

 

 

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Film & Propaganda Jul 12

Academy summer SHORT course

 PROPAGANDA & FILM

Course leader: Paul Turelli

$15 – includes refreshments

Proceeds from this event go directly to the Academy technology fund.

Wednesday July 12
1 – 3:30 pm (with a short intermission)
6500 E. Girard Avenue (inside Calvary Baptist Church) Fellowship Hall

We are more impacted by propaganda today than during Nazi Germany!  Preposterous idea? Perhaps.  But look at the history of film, the corporate media, commercialization and our current political polarization, and you may begin to agree.  For a little over two hours, we will take a look at these ideas thru short film clips and lecture notes to get the audience to think and voice their thoughts and opinions about where we are today in the world of ‘information and truth.’  What is the lens through which you view what is happening today and in your life time?  Come and enjoy an afternoon of thoughtful inquiry into the bubble in which we all live.

 

 

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FREE One-Day Academy-Tell a Friend

ONE-DAY Academy PRESENTATIONS, COURSE ROUND-UP,
ONLINE and ONSITE REGISTRATION + SNACKS

aug. 9, 2017, 9:30 am-1:30 pm

at The Academy, (CBC, 6500 E. Girard Ave., Denver 80224

IT’s FREE!

Presentations include:

Brad Calvert Future Metro Denver on the Cutting Edge – (class meets Thursdays 1:15 – 3:00). In recent years, “millennials” have been the defining demographic factor for metro Denver growth. Well, “seniors” have become the defining demographic for the future. How is population growth, including the impact of “seniors,” going to affect metro living? This course will educate you about metropolitan cooperation, characterized by the Brookings Institution as among the best examples in the country. You will also study what transportation, housing affordability and choice will look like and how will they affect your lifestyle. Digital technology will be addressed as it is redefining urban planning and service delivery. Denver is rumored to be the preferred site of Google to demonstrate the “City of the Future.”  Come get a taste of what all the excitement is about.

Brad Calvert is the Regional Planning and Development Director, Denver Regional Council of Governments and one of the many featured speakers of this class.    

David Marsh – U.S. Highway 50 the “Main Street of America” – (class meets Wednesday 11:30 – 1:00)
Time Magazine calls U.S. Highway 50 the “main street of America”–the highway extends from Maryland’s eastern shore to Sacramento and passes through Washington, D.C., Cincinnati, St. Louis, Kansas City and the heartland of America. What were the noble ideas that shaped our nation and how have these ideas played out as we tour across the country? This class will use Highway 50 to explore America from its founding, early development, the Civil War, and westward expansion, to our current life together.  Today’s presentation will be just a glimpse of what we will learn this semester.

David Marsh, former Associate Dean for Academic Programs in the Rossier School of Education at USC specialized in curriculum and instruction.  He was also an adviser to the California and U.S. Departments of Education .

Susan Blake-Smith – Hamilton:  The Man & the Musical (class meets Wednesdays 1:30 – 3:00)
Hamilton, the record-breaking Broadway sensation, has sparked new interest in one of America’s most fascinating founding fathers.   Using songs from the musical as our backdrop, we’ll touch on the highlights of Alexander Hamilton’s remarkable story from his brutal childhood in St. Croix to his meteoric rise to Secretary of the Treasury, his role in the country’s first publicized sex scandal and his fateful duel with Aaron Burr.   We will discuss why the musical has “revolutionized” Broadway and whether it is historically accurate.  While this lecture can only scratch the surface of what will be presented during the course in the fall, it will be fast-paced, fun and informative.  To quote a line from the musical:  you’re going to “want to be in the room where it happens.”

 Susan Blake-Smith has been an enthusiastic member of The Academy since its inception where she has taught Spanish for many years and facilitated a popular counterfactual history class called “What If?”  

The Day includes:

-Information about all Spring courses

-Chance to meet course leaders and learn about their courses.

-Coffee, snacks

-Assistance with Online registration  for classes beginning Sept. 12, 13, 14.

No RSVPs necessary. 6500 E Girard Ave, Denver CO 80224
INFO@ACADEMYLL.ORG
(303) 770-0786 (Messages only)

Print ODA Flier HERE

 

 

 

 

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Not Your Average Crime&Court Show

Do you like a good Law & Order, CSI or Chicago whatever?

Well stop watching it on TV and experience it through people who actually live in the real world of crime, law and society. We have an appellate justice, trial lawyer, attorney general to tell tales of what’s really going on in the courtroom and society.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE: CURRENT ISSUES IN CONTEXT
COURSE LEADER: Barry Mahoney
Barry Mahoney has worked on criminal justice issues for over 50 years as a litigating attorney, researcher, teacher, and consultant. He is the author of numerous publications on justice system operations and issues, has taught widely in the U.S. and abroad, and has received awards for distinguished service from leading national organizations. Barry is a graduate of Dartmouth College and Harvard Law School, and holds a PhD in Political Science from Columbia University.

MEETS: 6 Thursdays TIME: 11:30am – 1:00pm
DATES COURSE MEETS: 3/16, 3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/20, 4/27
PRICE: $65
TYPE: Lecture,Discussion

In the past three years, long-simmering resentments about police practices and, more broadly, about harsh sentencing practices have dominated the news. Current policies and proposed reforms will be considered in light of the historical roots of key issues. Topics covered will include mass incarceration, drug policies, wrongful conviction of innocent persons, race and justice, money and justice, and prospects for meaningful reform. We’ll discuss possible changes in policies, practices, and law, and the impacts that such changes could have on the goal of a fair and effective justice system.



DISSECTING THE JURY SYSTEM
COURSE LEADERS: Judge Steve Bernard, Rosalie Goldman, Dr. Sheila Porter, Sharon Vary
Steven Bernard was a prosecutor for 28 years.  For the past five years he has been a judge on the Colorado Court of Appeals, where he has presided for over five years. He has frequently considered constitutional questions during his career. The Constitution is the document upon which our system of government is based and Steve believes that education about this seminal document is essential to an understanding of our system of government, and to understanding the rights of citizens. Rosalie Goldman, a semi-retired Special Education teacher and a community volunteer, has a lifelong interest in current events and civil and human rights.  She wanted to organize and facilitate this course to offer Academy members this forum to gain information and hear divergent views on contemporary topics. Since retirement has unfolded, Sheila Porter’s interest in people and places have taken her to far flung locations and led her to doing psychological evaluations of asylum seekers seeking refuge in the U.S. Both activities have made her look at cultural differences, belief systems, the courage it takes to start a new life in a new place and the pros and cons of assimilation. As a psychologist and the granddaughter of immigrants, the multiple layers of what ‘diversity’ involves continue to engage her interest and provide her with a few answers and many more questions.
MEETS: 5 Thursdays TIME: 1:30pm – 3:00pm
DATES COURSE MEETS: 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/16
PRICE: $60
TYPE: Lecture,Q&A
NEW! What do a judge, a defense attorney and a prosecutor look for in their jury selection? Who gets chosen and why? What is the impact of serving on a jury, of being sequestered or having a life or death decision rest in your hands? And, even more importantly, what is the history of this enigmatic system and what impacts on peoples’ approach to the whole concept of ‘punishment’? Join three judges, two attorneys and a panel of jurors for an in-depth look at this intriguing part of our justice system. Participants will hear about the history of the system from attorneys, judges and those who have served on a jury, capped off by a discussion of ‘punishment’ itself and our need to seek retribution. REQUIRED READING: Morris B. Hoffman. The Punisher’s Brain. Cambridge University Press, 2014.

ANATOMY OF A MURDER TRIAL
COURSE LEADER: Dennis Wanebo
Dennis Wanebo is a lawyer who has tried hundreds of jury trials—civil and criminal—as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney.  He has tried complex civil cases, and, on the criminal side, everything from traffic to murder. Dennis is a Denver native, Vietnam-era Navy veteran, graduate of Metropolitan State University, and the University of Colorado School of Law, where he was editor-in-chief of the law review.  He currently serves as a part-time municipal judge in Boulder and in Westminster.  He coaches a small high school’s mock trial team, and has taken that team to the state finals year after year.MEETS: 6 Thursdays TIME: 9:30am – 11:00am
DATES COURSE MEETS: 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/16, 3/23
PRICE: $60
TYPE: Lecture,Discussion
NEW! Get a front seat to the trial system by turning one particular case inside out: the 1981 interstate-contract murder of a young mother in Boulder County. The instructor, who originally tried the case, will set the scene, introduce the characters, discuss constitutional issues, explore the pros and cons of “going for the death penalty,” discuss plea bargains and examine the jury system. Class limit is 25.

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Hat Expert Profiled in Post

 

The Academy is always seeking out the best of the best to teach our courses. This Spring is no exception.

Dr. Beverly Chico was a long-time teacher at some of the best universities in the nation. Her passion lies in Headwear, and she is teaching a course about how hats display culture, starting March 9-April 6.

Just a couple of years ago, the Denver Post interviewed Chico to learn about her studies:

Denver Post article on Dr. Beverly Chico

LIFESTYLES

History professor and author Beverly Chico fairly brims with knowledge about headwear

By Claire Martin
The Denver Post

POSTED:   10/31/2013 12:01:00 AM MDTADD A COMMENT| UPDATED:   2 YEARS AGO

 

GREENWOOD VILLAGE — If there is such a thing as a thinking cap, it’s somewhere in the collection of more than 600 hats and headwear amassed by Regis University and Metropolitan State University history professor Beverly Chico.

Hats are much more than a superficial accessory, she believes. They signify rank in military and religious orders and provide protection as well as hint at the wearer’s style.

“Four of the five senses are in your head, and it’s through our senses that we interact with the world,” Chico said. “It’s through the face and head that emotions are expressed. So hats are one of the most important artifacts from around the world.”

A silver Miao hat

A silver Miao hat (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

For further evidence, pick up a copy of ” Hats and Headwear Around the World: A Cultural Encyclopedia.” Chico described it as a “summation of my life.” It’s 532 pages long, weighs nearly two and a half pounds, and costs $100, a price point that Chico acknowledges may be daunting.

But true hat aficionados will find it an invaluable addition to their libraries, which perhaps already include Chico’s articles“Mexican Headwear,”

A Thai dancer’s headpiece

A Thai dancer’s headpiece (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

bergfashionlibrary.com/viewencyclopedia/bewdf/BEWDF-v2/EDch2036.xml” target=”_blank”>”Central American Headwear,” “Caribbean Headwear” and “South American Headwear” in volume 2 of theEncyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion (Oxford University Press). She also wrote “The Turban and Male Headwear in Central and Southeast Asia” for the Encyclopedia’s Volume 5.

A French feather Cloche hat from the 1920s

A French feather Cloche hat from the 1920s (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

Small, with a slash of bright red lipstick and dark hair she wears in a ballet dancer’s bun, Chico began collecting hats in 1955, when she was living in dictator Francisco Franco’s Spain as a college student. Franco’s control of Spain virtually cut it off from the rest of Europe. As a consequence, Spain “had the best flea market in Europe,” offering bargains on historic, collectable hats, she says.

When Chico returned to the U.S., she brought back hats, including a 500-year-old Samurai helmet, and a burgeoning passion for the stories they told.

A Chinese tiger hat

A Chinese tiger hat (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

“Headwear is like a walking billboard,” she said. It’s very subtle, but hats make you taller. The taller you are, the bigger you seem, a psychological message that announces you are important. Look at the spiked helmets soldiers wore. Look at a Shinto priest’s ceremonial hat. It’s like a pillbox with a tail. But only the emperor can wear the tail standing up, because he’s the intermediary between humans and the gods.”

Chico also sees hats as mileposts, and as talismans.

Here is an autographed golf hat that legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus sent her after she wrote to Nicklaus about her father, a member of Palm Beach’s elite Old Guard Society of golfers.

Here is the military hat that her son, Matthew, grabbed when the family attended the eldest son’s 1982 graduation from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. Chico knew that in the traditional hat tossthe hats are up for grabs. Matthew initially was reluctant.

“Do you want supper?” she asked him. He sprang out and returned with three hats, including the hat of May Holland Johnson, one of the first women to graduate from Annapolis. Today, it’s among the neatly labeled boxes in the Chico home’s Hat Room.

Here is a miner’s helmet with a propane-lit torch (a nod to her husband, Ray Chico, a mining geologist.) And a gaucho hat that represents Ray’s Argentine roots. And a bark-cloth hat acquired in 1987, an Indonesian souvenir with grim ties to Michael de Guzman’s Bre-X gold scam.

Here is her mother’s nurse’s aide cap that dates to her training during World War II.

Here are hats her son Greg brought from Africa and Thailand. Here is a cone-shaped fisherman’s hat, containing a message between the layers of straw, that son Matthew brought back from his Peace Corps service in the South Pacific.

Here is a Bedouin headpiece from a trip to the Sinai desert, and here a head ring from Rwanda, where the rings stabilize the buckets women carry on their heads. Here is a Brownie beret, a nod to daughter Tita’s Girl Scout days.

“People ask me which is my favorite hat,” she says.

“I say, ‘That’s like asking me which is my favorite child.'”

It’s hard to choose a favorite among so many hats with so many compelling stories.

One example: The disconcertingly jaunty masallahceremonial feathered hat worn by a Turkish boy on the day of his circumcision. Finding that hat required seeking out an Istanbul store that specialized in ceremonial circumcision outfits, a quest that earned Chico a few double-takes.

And with so many hundreds of hats and headwear to choose from, guess what kind of hat Chico wears?

She doesn’t. Instead, she wraps colorful ribbons, chosen to complement her outfit, around the bun that sits high on her head, and lets the ribbons trail down her neck.

“I decided that after I turned 50, I shouldn’t wear my hair long,” she said. “So I put it up in a bun, as the Spanish women do, and my sister suggested the ribbons.”

join Beverly in her class on Wednesdays at 1 pm. to learn more. Please email info@academyll.org for more information.

 

 

 

 

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Profile: Thoroughly Modern Ellie

We are so proud to have had Ellie Greenberg serve as Social Science Chair on The Academy’s Curriculum Committee. Ellie has brought us Academy classics like “All Rise! Our Courts” and Steve Bernard’s courses over the past three years.

Her most recent contribution was coordinating the NEW Academy course this fall: “Modern Family: 21st Century Issues” being presented by various attorney at Gutterman Griffiths PC Family Law. The course starts Oct. 29 and runs for four weeks. Topic areas covered are: Anatomy of a Divorce, types of Colorado marriages, Low Impact Divorce, and marijuana and the legal matters relating to the drug’s place in divorce. Read More about the Modern Family Class by clicking here

A life of learning and social change

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Centennial’s Ellie Greenberg helped organize Martin Luther King’s visit to Littleton in 1964. Photos by Peter Jones

Centennial’s Ellie Greenberg helped organize Martin Luther King’s visit to Littleton in 1964. Photos by Peter Jones

At 82, Centennial’s Ellie Greenberg isn’t done yet

BY PETER JONES
STAFF WRITER

Elinor Greenberg – known as Ellie to her friends – was a strange neighbor when her family built a house in what was then greater Littleton in the late 1950s.

Having received her master’s degree in speech pathology in 1954, she was on the faculties of the University of Colorado and Loretto Heights College at a time when many women were attending the June Cleaver school of stay-at-home moms.

Greenberg and her late husband Manny were also Democrats during a period when the south suburbs were strongly dominated by Republicans.

What’s more, the Greenbergs were outspoken civil-rights activists, even as segregation and white flight to the suburbs were playing out in Arapahoe County.

Last but not least, the family was Jewish.

“One of my motivations for moving out here is I wanted my children to grow up knowing what it is like to be a minority,” Greenberg said. “I felt that was a much better preparation for life.”

As the mother of three continued her career and education for decades, eventually receiving her doctorate in 1981, Greenberg found time to take a leadership role in Littleton’s small, but passionate, civil-rights movement, eventually welcoming an unlikely visit from Martin Luther King Jr.

“My career was in higher education, but it was about creating access to opportunity,” Greenberg said.

Decades later, the activist-educator would travel to Germany’s Dachau concentration camp as part of a high-profile delegation that would be the basis for a local television documentary called Journey for Justice.

Over the years, Greenberg would author nine books, including 2008’s critically popular A Time of Our Own: In Celebration of Women Over Sixty….

Full article here
Ellie Greenberg in The Villager

 

 

 

 

 

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Map Maven has Hidden Talent

Long-time Academy course leader Lorraine Sherry is excited for her two new projects.  She helped organize “Map Month May” with the Denver Public Library through the Rocky Mountain Map Society and is teaching a course on Baroque Music at The Academy next fall (hint: hidden talent.)

Lorraine Sherry

For Map Month May, there are four lectures, three exhibits, and a map fair.  Venues are at the Denver Public Library, University of Denver, and CU-Boulder. Please click below to get more info about this event.

Map Month 2015 brochure1 (1)
http://www.rmmaps.org/

While Maps might be her main claim to fame at The Academy, Lorraine spends a lot of time championing Baroque music. Her class, taking place in Fall 2015, takes on this important mussical movement. Over the past 30 years, the Boulder/Denver metro area has become one of the most important centers for the current “Renaissance” of early music.

Six local, world-class musicians who have sung, played, or directed choral and instrumental music of the Renaissance and Baroque periods throughout the USA and Europe will play music and share their experiences with you, including:
Where and how they found early music manuscripts
250 years of vocal music: from rich polyphony to harmony
Musical forms and styles from early Renaissance to late Baroque
The birth of the orchestra and evolution of musical instruments
The development of opera from musical drama
The art and excitement of performing early music.

Lorraine Sherry’s training and experience has been in science, technology, and educational research. However, herpassion in life has always been music – primarily singing – beginning with her first solo in third grade. Although she majored in physics while attending undergraduate and graduate schools, she minored in music at Vassar and took a one-year graduate course in the music of J.S. Bach at M.I.T. from Klaus Liepmann. She studied voice with Albert Van Ackere (formerly of Pro Musica, Brussels), Maria Coffey in Boston, and Rebecca Barker in Florida. At home with her family in New York City, musical training and performance was as valued as higher education. Listening to the Metropolitan Opera performances on the radio was as important as attending church on Sundays. Taking diction training at the Met enabled her to attend the Saturday opera matinees for free. Lorraine sang in school plays and concerts and was selected for Allstate Choir while in high school in Long Island. She was elected president of the Opera Workshop at Vassar. Lorraine has been a member of many choirs including the Gregorian Chant choir at Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Poughkeepsie, Vassar Glee Club and Madrigal Group, Radcliffe Choral Society, Masterworks Chorale in Boston, First Presbyterian Church Choir in Winter Haven Florida (choir member & soloist), Boca Magna Cantores in Lakeland Florida (16 voice semi-professional chorus), Central Florida Bach Festival, Central Florida Messiah Chorale, St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral Choir in Denver, Boulder Bach Festival, and Boulder Messiah Chorale. She supported symphonies, choirs, early music societies, and chamber music groups wherever she lived, and she continues to sing with the Boulder Messiah Chorale every Christmas.

Lorraine hails from the east coast (New York, Massachusetts, Florida).  She has a B.A. in physics from Vassar, three master’s degrees, and a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership & Innovation from the University of Colorado.  She was a Senior Research Associate at RMC Research Corporation in Larimer Square until she retired in 2005.  She has been a member of The Academy since 2006 and has facilitated courses in cartography, music, and historic garden design.  She is a Colorado Master Gardener, has sung with many semi-professional and informal choral societies, and is an avid international traveler.  She is the Secretary/Webmaster and Director of the Rocky Mountain Map Society (www.RMmaps.org).  Her personal collection of antique maps focuses on the geography of Eastern Europe, Lithuania, and Russia in the 15th to 19th centuries.

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