Boxed Lunch Brigade Week of March 21

The Academy for Lifelong Learning is having box lunches delivered
March 21, 12:30-1:30 pm
March 22, 11 am-1:30 pm
March 23, 11 am-1:30 pm
This is simply a courtesy to you to enjoy lunch with classmates.
All you need to do is:
1. Know What day or days you want to have lunch at The Academy
2. RSVP
3. Bring $ to the Academy ON THE DAY YOU WILL EAT LUNCH.
A variety of lunches will be offered. If you don’t eat meat or bread, please check the vegetarian option.
PLEASE  RSVP no later than 8 pm, March 19.

Lunch includes a sandwich, side, dessert and drink.

Please bring $9 cash or check payable to The Academy. This link is just for RSVPs, please bring payment to The Academy.

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION BY CLICKING HERE

 Lunch will be held in the Welcome Area.

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Opera Colorado Young Artists 3/28

L’Elisir d’Amore / The Elixir of Love

Free to Academy members and their Guests
Tues, March 28, 11:30 am-1 pm – Sanctuary

Experience the one-hour, English language version of Donizetti’s romantic comedy, The Elixir of Love.  With a few costumes, and a portable set, the Young Artists will deliver the fun of this live opera performance. Can the bumbling peasant Nemorino win the heart of the beautiful Adina with the help of a magic “elixir” from the snake-oil-salesman, Dulcamara? Come share that experience with us at the Academy on March 28.

6500 E Girard Ave, Denver CO 80224
No Need to RSVP

Opera Performance flier

Opera Colorado Young Artist Cast, Elixir

Elixir Synopsis-Opera Colorado Young Artists

 

 

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IN MEMORIAM: Lois Martin

The Academy has lost a dear friend, a tireless worker and a relentless Academy supporter with the passing of Lois Martin.Lois Martin

Since the Academy’s inception Lois was always found in numerous classes, taking notes and adding her thoughts and perspective to the discussion.  For many years she led the ‘Experts and Entertainers’ class of lunchtime speakers and discussion. She pursued every lead and every speaker suggestion to line up a broad variety of people and topics for our members’ enjoyment over many terms of Academy classes. Her eager mind was limitless in its scope and her choice of classes to participate in was wide ranging. All of us will miss her eagerness to learn, her willingness to help and her always ready smiles and greetings.

Lois Martin came to Denver by way of Philadelphia and Nebraska. She majored in journalism at the University of Nebraska, before she moved to Pennsylvania while her husband was in medical school. She has been editor of internal publications for Campbell Soup Co. and Leeds and Northrup, both in the East. After the arrival of her four children, she founded the Aurora Sun Newspaper where she worked for 20 years as publisher. She was founding moderator of the Aurora Hospital Association, President of the Aurora Hospital District, Business Person of the Year for the Aurora Chamber of Commerce, and elected to the Benson Hall of Fame for Community Leadership.

 

 

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Cookie Week Fall 16

Academy Cookie Week is Oct. 4, 5, 6Cookies

Simply bring a dozen cookies (or other snack of your choice) on a disposable plate or tray to share at coffee breaks.
Homemade is always appreciated but store bought is great as well.
Feel free to place your cookies/snacks on the table near the coffee/tea (back of Fellowship Hall) when you arrive or at your convenience.
And of course, enjoy a treat yourself before or after class or during the break!

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Tattered Cover Hosts Book Fair at Academy

Nov. 1-3, 10-3 p.m. 

A great way to support The Academy and find some wonderful books.

The Academy for Lifelong Learning is proud to announce a book fair of Colorado authors taking place at The Academy, 6500 E. Girard Ave., Denver 80224,tattered-cover-logo

You may purchase books by Ausma Zehanat Khan, along with a wide-range of other selections from Colorado authors. The Tattered Cover will give the Academy 10 percent of its sales to benefit the our scholarship and technology fund.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD AND PRINT THIS FLIER

FREE to members and guests, No RSVP necessary
At the Academy for Lifelong Learning,
6500 E Girard Ave, Denver 80224

 

 

 

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Newbies Answer Questionnaire

Our Newest Course Leaders Answer the Proust Questionnaire.

Not really, but still a fun read. Click on the Course Title below to find out more and to register.

Course Leader Name: Matt Wigdahl
Course Title:  Film- The Essence of the Art.
10 -12:45 WED AM, 10/19-11/16
$55   Viewing, Discussion

Why do you love teaching?
I love teaching for the surprises it yields.

What new thing did you learn while preparing for your course?
I learned that rubber cement is a more effective adhesive than double-sided tape for hanging movie posters.

What is your idea of perfect happiness?
Perfect happiness is sitting stream-side anywhere in the west with my wife watching our daughter cast a fly with either hand to a rising trout.

Greatest Fear?
My greatest fear is using the word “notwithstanding” in public.

Which historical figure do you most identify with?
I most identify with Emily Dickinson.

Which living person do you most admire?
Barack Obama has more cool than anyone I’ve seen.  He has my most admiration.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?
Honesty is the most overrated value.

What is your favorite journey?
My favorite journey is writing a sonnet.

Which talent would you most like to have?
I would most like to compose or play music.

What is your current state of mind?
Usually, overturned.  But I am most comfortable overturned. As Rabelais said, “The mind is never so much itself, as when it has been lately overturned.”

My greatest achievement:
Helping my wife raise a cool, funny, generally well-balanced daughter.

If you were to die and come back as a person or thing, what do you think it would be?
I would come back as a 12th Century Nomadic Tribesman wandering the steppes of Central Asia.

Favorite Writers:

Flaubert, Virginia Woolf, Jane Austen, Twain, Cather, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and about 74 others.

Motto:  
What word might work better here?

Where would you most like to live?
I would most like to live on The Pacific Coast of this continent.  Oregon, (where we already do), usually wins my heart.

 

David Scruggs
David Scruggs

Course Leader Name David W. Scruggs
Course Title: Apollo Missions: An Insiders View
TUES PM, 9/27-11/15
$75   Lecture, Q&A

Why do you love teaching?
It is fun and the students learn.

What new thing did you learn while preparing for your course?
That I’m getting old.

What is your idea of perfect happiness?
I lived it.

What is your greatest fear?
Heights even though I’m a pilot

Which historical figure do you most identify with?
Dwight Eisenhower

Which talent would you most like to have?
To be able to spell with ease

What is your current state of mind?
Content

What do you consider your greatest achievement?
President and CEO Advanced Technology Associates, Inc. for 20 years

What is your motto?
Never go back

Where would you most like to live?
Here

Course Leader: Karyl Meyer
Course Title: READERS THEATRE: ACTING OUT!
TUES PM, 9/13-10/25, performance date pending
$65   Reading, performing

Why do you love teaching?
I love collaborative, creative teaching because I love seeing people try new things and grow. There are surprises in every class.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?
Patience. Sometimes impatience is required to get the job done.

What is your favorite journey?
One I’ve never taken before!

Which talent would you most like to have?
I’d love to be able to sing beautifully, or at least on key.

If you were to die and come back as a person or thing, what do you think it would be?
Shakespeare – to be able to both write and act as he did would be sublime.

Who are your favorite writers?
Shakespeare and John Irving

Tim Steele
Tim Steele

Course Leader Name:  Timothy D. Steele
Course Title:  Water is Life-Global and Local Issues
WED AM 10/19-11/16
$50   Lecture, Q&A

Why do you love teaching?
Mentoring/teaching gives fulfillment when students/attendees get excited about a topic as I do!

What new thing did you learn while preparing for your course?
Three percent of people living on Iceland are Polish.

What is your greatest fear?  
That the general public is unwilling to take proactive measures to minimize or reduce the adverse impacts of climate change.

Which living person do you most admire?
President Barack Obama.

What is your favorite journey?  
Life is a one-time journey.

Which talent would you most like to have?
Instill Hoosier humor into my dealings with others

What is your motto?  
Be Prepared (from Scouting) and Stay In Touch (from marriage(s))

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Mars: Straight from the Telescope July 27

To Welcome you to our new home, The Academy presents:

EXPLORING MARS ONE GIANT IMAGE AT A TIME

Wednesday, July 27, 1-3 pm followed by reception and classroom tours

Presentation by Dr. Jim Bergstrom, Ball Aerospace & Technologies

Although this amazing telescope launched over 10 years ago, the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera remains the largest telescope ever sent to another solar system body. Since arriving in Mars’ orbit in March 2006, it has collected over 40,000 high-resolution, stunning images of the planet’s topography, past- and present-day surface water and even spacecraft ascending from its atmosphere. Get an understanding of the MRO Mission, a description of the HiRISE Instrument, a brief reflection on launch activities at Kennedy Space Center and the current status of the MRO Mission.

Seasonal flows Mars
Seasonal flows on warm Martian slopes may be caused by the flow of salty water on Mars.

Dr. Bergstrom has 35 years of experience in the design, development and testing of electro-optic instruments and components. Jim retired in 2014 from Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., after 18 years of work on remote sensing instruments there. He continues part-time as a consultant to Ball and remains the Chief Systems Engineer for the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera.

This is a FREE event for you and a friend. No RSVPs necessary.

Onsite registration available at this event. 6500 E Girard Ave, Denver CO 80224

Print the Mars information by clicking here.

ACADEMYLL.ORG     INFO@ACADEMYLL.ORG     (303) 770-0786

 

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Not Your Average Crime&Court Show

Do you like a good Law & Order, CSI or Chicago whatever?

Well stop watching it on TV and experience it through people who actually live in the real world of crime, law and society. We have an appellate justice, trial lawyer, attorney general to tell tales of what’s really going on in the courtroom and society.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE: CURRENT ISSUES IN CONTEXT
COURSE LEADER: Barry Mahoney
Barry Mahoney has worked on criminal justice issues for over 50 years as a litigating attorney, researcher, teacher, and consultant. He is the author of numerous publications on justice system operations and issues, has taught widely in the U.S. and abroad, and has received awards for distinguished service from leading national organizations. Barry is a graduate of Dartmouth College and Harvard Law School, and holds a PhD in Political Science from Columbia University.

MEETS: 6 Thursdays TIME: 11:30am – 1:00pm
DATES COURSE MEETS: 3/16, 3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/20, 4/27
PRICE: $65
TYPE: Lecture,Discussion

In the past three years, long-simmering resentments about police practices and, more broadly, about harsh sentencing practices have dominated the news. Current policies and proposed reforms will be considered in light of the historical roots of key issues. Topics covered will include mass incarceration, drug policies, wrongful conviction of innocent persons, race and justice, money and justice, and prospects for meaningful reform. We’ll discuss possible changes in policies, practices, and law, and the impacts that such changes could have on the goal of a fair and effective justice system.



DISSECTING THE JURY SYSTEM
COURSE LEADERS: Judge Steve Bernard, Rosalie Goldman, Dr. Sheila Porter, Sharon Vary
Steven Bernard was a prosecutor for 28 years.  For the past five years he has been a judge on the Colorado Court of Appeals, where he has presided for over five years. He has frequently considered constitutional questions during his career. The Constitution is the document upon which our system of government is based and Steve believes that education about this seminal document is essential to an understanding of our system of government, and to understanding the rights of citizens. Rosalie Goldman, a semi-retired Special Education teacher and a community volunteer, has a lifelong interest in current events and civil and human rights.  She wanted to organize and facilitate this course to offer Academy members this forum to gain information and hear divergent views on contemporary topics. Since retirement has unfolded, Sheila Porter’s interest in people and places have taken her to far flung locations and led her to doing psychological evaluations of asylum seekers seeking refuge in the U.S. Both activities have made her look at cultural differences, belief systems, the courage it takes to start a new life in a new place and the pros and cons of assimilation. As a psychologist and the granddaughter of immigrants, the multiple layers of what ‘diversity’ involves continue to engage her interest and provide her with a few answers and many more questions.
MEETS: 5 Thursdays TIME: 1:30pm – 3:00pm
DATES COURSE MEETS: 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/16
PRICE: $60
TYPE: Lecture,Q&A
NEW! What do a judge, a defense attorney and a prosecutor look for in their jury selection? Who gets chosen and why? What is the impact of serving on a jury, of being sequestered or having a life or death decision rest in your hands? And, even more importantly, what is the history of this enigmatic system and what impacts on peoples’ approach to the whole concept of ‘punishment’? Join three judges, two attorneys and a panel of jurors for an in-depth look at this intriguing part of our justice system. Participants will hear about the history of the system from attorneys, judges and those who have served on a jury, capped off by a discussion of ‘punishment’ itself and our need to seek retribution. REQUIRED READING: Morris B. Hoffman. The Punisher’s Brain. Cambridge University Press, 2014.

ANATOMY OF A MURDER TRIAL
COURSE LEADER: Dennis Wanebo
Dennis Wanebo is a lawyer who has tried hundreds of jury trials—civil and criminal—as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney.  He has tried complex civil cases, and, on the criminal side, everything from traffic to murder. Dennis is a Denver native, Vietnam-era Navy veteran, graduate of Metropolitan State University, and the University of Colorado School of Law, where he was editor-in-chief of the law review.  He currently serves as a part-time municipal judge in Boulder and in Westminster.  He coaches a small high school’s mock trial team, and has taken that team to the state finals year after year.MEETS: 6 Thursdays TIME: 9:30am – 11:00am
DATES COURSE MEETS: 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/16, 3/23
PRICE: $60
TYPE: Lecture,Discussion
NEW! Get a front seat to the trial system by turning one particular case inside out: the 1981 interstate-contract murder of a young mother in Boulder County. The instructor, who originally tried the case, will set the scene, introduce the characters, discuss constitutional issues, explore the pros and cons of “going for the death penalty,” discuss plea bargains and examine the jury system. Class limit is 25.

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Hat Expert Profiled in Post

 

The Academy is always seeking out the best of the best to teach our courses. This Spring is no exception.

Dr. Beverly Chico was a long-time teacher at some of the best universities in the nation. Her passion lies in Headwear, and she is teaching a course about how hats display culture, starting March 9-April 6.

Just a couple of years ago, the Denver Post interviewed Chico to learn about her studies:

Denver Post article on Dr. Beverly Chico

LIFESTYLES

History professor and author Beverly Chico fairly brims with knowledge about headwear

By Claire Martin
The Denver Post

POSTED:   10/31/2013 12:01:00 AM MDTADD A COMMENT| UPDATED:   2 YEARS AGO

 

GREENWOOD VILLAGE — If there is such a thing as a thinking cap, it’s somewhere in the collection of more than 600 hats and headwear amassed by Regis University and Metropolitan State University history professor Beverly Chico.

Hats are much more than a superficial accessory, she believes. They signify rank in military and religious orders and provide protection as well as hint at the wearer’s style.

“Four of the five senses are in your head, and it’s through our senses that we interact with the world,” Chico said. “It’s through the face and head that emotions are expressed. So hats are one of the most important artifacts from around the world.”

A silver Miao hat

A silver Miao hat (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

For further evidence, pick up a copy of ” Hats and Headwear Around the World: A Cultural Encyclopedia.” Chico described it as a “summation of my life.” It’s 532 pages long, weighs nearly two and a half pounds, and costs $100, a price point that Chico acknowledges may be daunting.

But true hat aficionados will find it an invaluable addition to their libraries, which perhaps already include Chico’s articles“Mexican Headwear,”

A Thai dancer’s headpiece

A Thai dancer’s headpiece (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

bergfashionlibrary.com/viewencyclopedia/bewdf/BEWDF-v2/EDch2036.xml” target=”_blank”>”Central American Headwear,” “Caribbean Headwear” and “South American Headwear” in volume 2 of theEncyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion (Oxford University Press). She also wrote “The Turban and Male Headwear in Central and Southeast Asia” for the Encyclopedia’s Volume 5.

A French feather Cloche hat from the 1920s

A French feather Cloche hat from the 1920s (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

Small, with a slash of bright red lipstick and dark hair she wears in a ballet dancer’s bun, Chico began collecting hats in 1955, when she was living in dictator Francisco Franco’s Spain as a college student. Franco’s control of Spain virtually cut it off from the rest of Europe. As a consequence, Spain “had the best flea market in Europe,” offering bargains on historic, collectable hats, she says.

When Chico returned to the U.S., she brought back hats, including a 500-year-old Samurai helmet, and a burgeoning passion for the stories they told.

A Chinese tiger hat

A Chinese tiger hat (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

“Headwear is like a walking billboard,” she said. It’s very subtle, but hats make you taller. The taller you are, the bigger you seem, a psychological message that announces you are important. Look at the spiked helmets soldiers wore. Look at a Shinto priest’s ceremonial hat. It’s like a pillbox with a tail. But only the emperor can wear the tail standing up, because he’s the intermediary between humans and the gods.”

Chico also sees hats as mileposts, and as talismans.

Here is an autographed golf hat that legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus sent her after she wrote to Nicklaus about her father, a member of Palm Beach’s elite Old Guard Society of golfers.

Here is the military hat that her son, Matthew, grabbed when the family attended the eldest son’s 1982 graduation from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. Chico knew that in the traditional hat tossthe hats are up for grabs. Matthew initially was reluctant.

“Do you want supper?” she asked him. He sprang out and returned with three hats, including the hat of May Holland Johnson, one of the first women to graduate from Annapolis. Today, it’s among the neatly labeled boxes in the Chico home’s Hat Room.

Here is a miner’s helmet with a propane-lit torch (a nod to her husband, Ray Chico, a mining geologist.) And a gaucho hat that represents Ray’s Argentine roots. And a bark-cloth hat acquired in 1987, an Indonesian souvenir with grim ties to Michael de Guzman’s Bre-X gold scam.

Here is her mother’s nurse’s aide cap that dates to her training during World War II.

Here are hats her son Greg brought from Africa and Thailand. Here is a cone-shaped fisherman’s hat, containing a message between the layers of straw, that son Matthew brought back from his Peace Corps service in the South Pacific.

Here is a Bedouin headpiece from a trip to the Sinai desert, and here a head ring from Rwanda, where the rings stabilize the buckets women carry on their heads. Here is a Brownie beret, a nod to daughter Tita’s Girl Scout days.

“People ask me which is my favorite hat,” she says.

“I say, ‘That’s like asking me which is my favorite child.'”

It’s hard to choose a favorite among so many hats with so many compelling stories.

One example: The disconcertingly jaunty masallahceremonial feathered hat worn by a Turkish boy on the day of his circumcision. Finding that hat required seeking out an Istanbul store that specialized in ceremonial circumcision outfits, a quest that earned Chico a few double-takes.

And with so many hundreds of hats and headwear to choose from, guess what kind of hat Chico wears?

She doesn’t. Instead, she wraps colorful ribbons, chosen to complement her outfit, around the bun that sits high on her head, and lets the ribbons trail down her neck.

“I decided that after I turned 50, I shouldn’t wear my hair long,” she said. “So I put it up in a bun, as the Spanish women do, and my sister suggested the ribbons.”

join Beverly in her class on Wednesdays at 1 pm. to learn more. Please email info@academyll.org for more information.

 

 

 

 

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