Meet Ausma Zehanat Khan + Book Fair

Author Presentation by:

Ausma Zehanat Khan

A Muslim Detective in an Anti-Muslim World.

Thurs., Nov. 3, Noon-1 pm. Book signing afterward.

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Ausma Zehanat Khan is the author of The Unquiet Dead (2015) and The Language of Secrets (2016). Both novels received widespread critical acclaim, including a Publishers Weekly starred review, and reviews in the LA Times and The New York Times. Her first novel builds upon her expertise in human rights and war crimes in the Balkans, while the second focuses on an anti-terrorist investigation. She holds a Ph.D. in international law and is the former editor-in-chief of Muslim Girl magazine.

You will enjoy her presentation about her books and career. Her books will be available for purchase at the accompanying Tattered Cover Book Fair, taking place at The Academy Nov. 1-3. The Book Fair will be available each day of classes from 9:30-3 p.m.  and will feature notable Colorado authors. The Tattered Cover is giving the Academy 10 percent of its sales.

Ms. Khan practiced immigration law in Toronto and has taught international human rights law at Northwestern University, as well as human rights and business law at York University. She is a long-time community activist and writer, and currently lives in Colorado with her husband.

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Print This Flyer about the Book Fair and Author Talk

FREE to members and guests, No RSVP necessary
At the Academy for Lifelong Learning, 
6500 E Girard Ave, Denver 80224

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Not Your Average Crime&Court Show

Do you like a good Law & Order, CSI or Chicago whatever?

Well stop watching it on TV and experience it through people who actually live in the real world of crime, law and society. We have an appellate justice, trial lawyer, attorney general to tell tales of what’s really going on in the courtroom and society.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE: CURRENT ISSUES IN CONTEXT
COURSE LEADER: Barry Mahoney
Barry Mahoney has worked on criminal justice issues for over 50 years as a litigating attorney, researcher, teacher, and consultant. He is the author of numerous publications on justice system operations and issues, has taught widely in the U.S. and abroad, and has received awards for distinguished service from leading national organizations. Barry is a graduate of Dartmouth College and Harvard Law School, and holds a PhD in Political Science from Columbia University.

MEETS: 6 Thursdays TIME: 11:30am – 1:00pm
DATES COURSE MEETS: 3/16, 3/23, 3/30, 4/6, 4/20, 4/27
PRICE: $65
TYPE: Lecture,Discussion

In the past three years, long-simmering resentments about police practices and, more broadly, about harsh sentencing practices have dominated the news. Current policies and proposed reforms will be considered in light of the historical roots of key issues. Topics covered will include mass incarceration, drug policies, wrongful conviction of innocent persons, race and justice, money and justice, and prospects for meaningful reform. We’ll discuss possible changes in policies, practices, and law, and the impacts that such changes could have on the goal of a fair and effective justice system.



DISSECTING THE JURY SYSTEM
COURSE LEADERS: Judge Steve Bernard, Rosalie Goldman, Dr. Sheila Porter, Sharon Vary
Steven Bernard was a prosecutor for 28 years.  For the past five years he has been a judge on the Colorado Court of Appeals, where he has presided for over five years. He has frequently considered constitutional questions during his career. The Constitution is the document upon which our system of government is based and Steve believes that education about this seminal document is essential to an understanding of our system of government, and to understanding the rights of citizens. Rosalie Goldman, a semi-retired Special Education teacher and a community volunteer, has a lifelong interest in current events and civil and human rights.  She wanted to organize and facilitate this course to offer Academy members this forum to gain information and hear divergent views on contemporary topics. Since retirement has unfolded, Sheila Porter’s interest in people and places have taken her to far flung locations and led her to doing psychological evaluations of asylum seekers seeking refuge in the U.S. Both activities have made her look at cultural differences, belief systems, the courage it takes to start a new life in a new place and the pros and cons of assimilation. As a psychologist and the granddaughter of immigrants, the multiple layers of what ‘diversity’ involves continue to engage her interest and provide her with a few answers and many more questions.
MEETS: 5 Thursdays TIME: 1:30pm – 3:00pm
DATES COURSE MEETS: 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/16
PRICE: $60
TYPE: Lecture,Q&A
NEW! What do a judge, a defense attorney and a prosecutor look for in their jury selection? Who gets chosen and why? What is the impact of serving on a jury, of being sequestered or having a life or death decision rest in your hands? And, even more importantly, what is the history of this enigmatic system and what impacts on peoples’ approach to the whole concept of ‘punishment’? Join three judges, two attorneys and a panel of jurors for an in-depth look at this intriguing part of our justice system. Participants will hear about the history of the system from attorneys, judges and those who have served on a jury, capped off by a discussion of ‘punishment’ itself and our need to seek retribution. REQUIRED READING: Morris B. Hoffman. The Punisher’s Brain. Cambridge University Press, 2014.

ANATOMY OF A MURDER TRIAL
COURSE LEADER: Dennis Wanebo
Dennis Wanebo is a lawyer who has tried hundreds of jury trials—civil and criminal—as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney.  He has tried complex civil cases, and, on the criminal side, everything from traffic to murder. Dennis is a Denver native, Vietnam-era Navy veteran, graduate of Metropolitan State University, and the University of Colorado School of Law, where he was editor-in-chief of the law review.  He currently serves as a part-time municipal judge in Boulder and in Westminster.  He coaches a small high school’s mock trial team, and has taken that team to the state finals year after year.MEETS: 6 Thursdays TIME: 9:30am – 11:00am
DATES COURSE MEETS: 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/16, 3/23
PRICE: $60
TYPE: Lecture,Discussion
NEW! Get a front seat to the trial system by turning one particular case inside out: the 1981 interstate-contract murder of a young mother in Boulder County. The instructor, who originally tried the case, will set the scene, introduce the characters, discuss constitutional issues, explore the pros and cons of “going for the death penalty,” discuss plea bargains and examine the jury system. Class limit is 25.

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Hat Expert Profiled in Post

 

The Academy is always seeking out the best of the best to teach our courses. This Spring is no exception.

Dr. Beverly Chico was a long-time teacher at some of the best universities in the nation. Her passion lies in Headwear, and she is teaching a course about how hats display culture, starting March 9-April 6.

Just a couple of years ago, the Denver Post interviewed Chico to learn about her studies:

Denver Post article on Dr. Beverly Chico

LIFESTYLES

History professor and author Beverly Chico fairly brims with knowledge about headwear

By Claire Martin
The Denver Post

POSTED:   10/31/2013 12:01:00 AM MDTADD A COMMENT| UPDATED:   2 YEARS AGO

 

GREENWOOD VILLAGE — If there is such a thing as a thinking cap, it’s somewhere in the collection of more than 600 hats and headwear amassed by Regis University and Metropolitan State University history professor Beverly Chico.

Hats are much more than a superficial accessory, she believes. They signify rank in military and religious orders and provide protection as well as hint at the wearer’s style.

“Four of the five senses are in your head, and it’s through our senses that we interact with the world,” Chico said. “It’s through the face and head that emotions are expressed. So hats are one of the most important artifacts from around the world.”

A silver Miao hat

A silver Miao hat (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

For further evidence, pick up a copy of ” Hats and Headwear Around the World: A Cultural Encyclopedia.” Chico described it as a “summation of my life.” It’s 532 pages long, weighs nearly two and a half pounds, and costs $100, a price point that Chico acknowledges may be daunting.

But true hat aficionados will find it an invaluable addition to their libraries, which perhaps already include Chico’s articles“Mexican Headwear,”

A Thai dancer’s headpiece

A Thai dancer’s headpiece (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

bergfashionlibrary.com/viewencyclopedia/bewdf/BEWDF-v2/EDch2036.xml” target=”_blank”>”Central American Headwear,” “Caribbean Headwear” and “South American Headwear” in volume 2 of theEncyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion (Oxford University Press). She also wrote “The Turban and Male Headwear in Central and Southeast Asia” for the Encyclopedia’s Volume 5.

A French feather Cloche hat from the 1920s

A French feather Cloche hat from the 1920s (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

Small, with a slash of bright red lipstick and dark hair she wears in a ballet dancer’s bun, Chico began collecting hats in 1955, when she was living in dictator Francisco Franco’s Spain as a college student. Franco’s control of Spain virtually cut it off from the rest of Europe. As a consequence, Spain “had the best flea market in Europe,” offering bargains on historic, collectable hats, she says.

When Chico returned to the U.S., she brought back hats, including a 500-year-old Samurai helmet, and a burgeoning passion for the stories they told.

A Chinese tiger hat

A Chinese tiger hat (Cyrus McCrimmon, The Denver Post)

“Headwear is like a walking billboard,” she said. It’s very subtle, but hats make you taller. The taller you are, the bigger you seem, a psychological message that announces you are important. Look at the spiked helmets soldiers wore. Look at a Shinto priest’s ceremonial hat. It’s like a pillbox with a tail. But only the emperor can wear the tail standing up, because he’s the intermediary between humans and the gods.”

Chico also sees hats as mileposts, and as talismans.

Here is an autographed golf hat that legendary golfer Jack Nicklaus sent her after she wrote to Nicklaus about her father, a member of Palm Beach’s elite Old Guard Society of golfers.

Here is the military hat that her son, Matthew, grabbed when the family attended the eldest son’s 1982 graduation from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. Chico knew that in the traditional hat tossthe hats are up for grabs. Matthew initially was reluctant.

“Do you want supper?” she asked him. He sprang out and returned with three hats, including the hat of May Holland Johnson, one of the first women to graduate from Annapolis. Today, it’s among the neatly labeled boxes in the Chico home’s Hat Room.

Here is a miner’s helmet with a propane-lit torch (a nod to her husband, Ray Chico, a mining geologist.) And a gaucho hat that represents Ray’s Argentine roots. And a bark-cloth hat acquired in 1987, an Indonesian souvenir with grim ties to Michael de Guzman’s Bre-X gold scam.

Here is her mother’s nurse’s aide cap that dates to her training during World War II.

Here are hats her son Greg brought from Africa and Thailand. Here is a cone-shaped fisherman’s hat, containing a message between the layers of straw, that son Matthew brought back from his Peace Corps service in the South Pacific.

Here is a Bedouin headpiece from a trip to the Sinai desert, and here a head ring from Rwanda, where the rings stabilize the buckets women carry on their heads. Here is a Brownie beret, a nod to daughter Tita’s Girl Scout days.

“People ask me which is my favorite hat,” she says.

“I say, ‘That’s like asking me which is my favorite child.'”

It’s hard to choose a favorite among so many hats with so many compelling stories.

One example: The disconcertingly jaunty masallahceremonial feathered hat worn by a Turkish boy on the day of his circumcision. Finding that hat required seeking out an Istanbul store that specialized in ceremonial circumcision outfits, a quest that earned Chico a few double-takes.

And with so many hundreds of hats and headwear to choose from, guess what kind of hat Chico wears?

She doesn’t. Instead, she wraps colorful ribbons, chosen to complement her outfit, around the bun that sits high on her head, and lets the ribbons trail down her neck.

“I decided that after I turned 50, I shouldn’t wear my hair long,” she said. “So I put it up in a bun, as the Spanish women do, and my sister suggested the ribbons.”

join Beverly in her class on Wednesdays at 1 pm. to learn more. Please email info@academyll.org for more information.

 

 

 

 

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Profile: Thoroughly Modern Ellie

We are so proud to have had Ellie Greenberg serve as Social Science Chair on The Academy’s Curriculum Committee. Ellie has brought us Academy classics like “All Rise! Our Courts” and Steve Bernard’s courses over the past three years.

Her most recent contribution was coordinating the NEW Academy course this fall: “Modern Family: 21st Century Issues” being presented by various attorney at Gutterman Griffiths PC Family Law. The course starts Oct. 29 and runs for four weeks. Topic areas covered are: Anatomy of a Divorce, types of Colorado marriages, Low Impact Divorce, and marijuana and the legal matters relating to the drug’s place in divorce. Read More about the Modern Family Class by clicking here

A life of learning and social change

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Centennial’s Ellie Greenberg helped organize Martin Luther King’s visit to Littleton in 1964. Photos by Peter Jones

Centennial’s Ellie Greenberg helped organize Martin Luther King’s visit to Littleton in 1964. Photos by Peter Jones

At 82, Centennial’s Ellie Greenberg isn’t done yet

BY PETER JONES
STAFF WRITER

Elinor Greenberg – known as Ellie to her friends – was a strange neighbor when her family built a house in what was then greater Littleton in the late 1950s.

Having received her master’s degree in speech pathology in 1954, she was on the faculties of the University of Colorado and Loretto Heights College at a time when many women were attending the June Cleaver school of stay-at-home moms.

Greenberg and her late husband Manny were also Democrats during a period when the south suburbs were strongly dominated by Republicans.

What’s more, the Greenbergs were outspoken civil-rights activists, even as segregation and white flight to the suburbs were playing out in Arapahoe County.

Last but not least, the family was Jewish.

“One of my motivations for moving out here is I wanted my children to grow up knowing what it is like to be a minority,” Greenberg said. “I felt that was a much better preparation for life.”

As the mother of three continued her career and education for decades, eventually receiving her doctorate in 1981, Greenberg found time to take a leadership role in Littleton’s small, but passionate, civil-rights movement, eventually welcoming an unlikely visit from Martin Luther King Jr.

“My career was in higher education, but it was about creating access to opportunity,” Greenberg said.

Decades later, the activist-educator would travel to Germany’s Dachau concentration camp as part of a high-profile delegation that would be the basis for a local television documentary called Journey for Justice.

Over the years, Greenberg would author nine books, including 2008’s critically popular A Time of Our Own: In Celebration of Women Over Sixty….

Full article here
Ellie Greenberg in The Villager

 

 

 

 

 

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Academy hosts own Firework Superstars!

Congratulations to newly appointed Colo. Supreme Court Justice Rich Gabriel and Academy Board member Dr. Toni Larson!

Justice Rich Gabriel served as one of the Academy’s speakers in the Academy’s “All Rise! Our Courts” class, most recently in Spring 2015. He usually gave the module regarding civil cases. The course, which has been going on for about five years, features attorneys and judges with first-hand courtroom experience and was designed by the Colorado Bar Association and the Colorado Judicial Institute’s Our Courts program to explain how State and Federal courts actually work—and how judicial procedures help keep the law fair and impartial. Topics have included:  The selection and evaluation of federal and state judges, differences between practices followed in criminal and civil cases, bankruptcy basics, divorce and family law, our rapidly changing immigration law, and how Abraham Lincoln’s commitment to equality and liberty transformed our system. For more on Our Courts:  http://ourcourtscolorado.org/

 

Follow the link to the formal announcement on the Colorado Courts webpage: Colo Supreme Court gets new Justice-court

 

Toni Larson

One June 25, 2015, Lt. Governor Joe Garcia declared it “Dr. Toni Larson Day,” for her unrelenting volunteer efforts for the state of Colorado and the National League of Women’s Voters. At the Academy Larson has been sparring on and off with Jim Kneser in some of his Critical Economics courses over the years and hosted last summer’s “Academy Voter Update.” As of July 1, The Academy is thrilled to have her on its Board of Directors.

Dr. Toni Larson served as executive director of Independent Higher Education of Colorado, a nonprofit organization that conducts the government relations work for Colorado College, Regis University, and the University of Denver.  Prior to this position she served in several capacities in the League of Women Voters. Currently, her main volunteer activities include the League of Women Voters of the United States (Vice President), Colorado Association of Nonprofit Organizations (co-chair, Public Policy Committee), and homeowners’ association board (President). She has been an affiliated faculty member at Regis University and an adjunct faculty member at the University of Denver.  Dr. Larson received a B.A. from Colorado College where she majored in English and minored in Zoology.  Her Master’s in Nonprofit Management is from Regis University, and she has a Ph.D. in Higher Education with an emphasis on policy studies from the University of Denver.

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Academy Board Member Receives High Honor

The Academy is proud to say that Board Treasurer Georgi Contiguglia is being honored with the following prestigious award. Congratulations Georgi!

Art

The Dana Crawford and State Honor Award Celebration is Colorado’s premiere statewide historic preservation awards event honoring the individuals and organizations that have made a significant contribution toward preserving Colorado’s historic resources. The evening’s namesake, Dana Crawford, is a preservation pioneer who proved that saving historic buildings makes sense – both culturally and economically.

Starting in 1988, with the State Honor Awards, and adding the Dana Crawford Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation in 1990, Colorado Preservation, Inc. recognizes accomplishments in the area of preservation, rehabilitation, promotion, philanthropy and leadership.

Dana Crawford Award for Excellence in Preservation
2015 Honoree – Georgianna “Georgi” Contiguglia

Presented May 6, 2015 at the History Colorado Center

Colorado Preservation, Inc. will be honoring Georgianna Contiguglia this year with the prestigious Dana Crawford Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation.  Georgi’s impressive achievements in historic preservation span 30 years including ten as President and CEO of the Colorado Historical Society, now called History Colorado, and as State Historic Preservation Officer.

Colorado Preservation Inc., invites you to purchase a table so that you and your friends can enjoy this intimate and inspiring gathering of preservation leaders.  The Dana Crawford and State Honor Awards event is our premier fundraiser.  Individual tickets will be available to the public on April 3rd.  For information, call Cindy Nasky, CPI Events & Development Manager at 303.893.4260 (ext. 230) or email cnasky@coloradopreservation.org.  We hope to see you for this fun evening!

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Academy Finance Expert Makes the ‘WSJ’

Eileen Sharkey is teaching “Financial Literacy: 21st Century Survival Skills” on Thursdays at 1 p.m., starting March 31.
She was featured in the Wall Street Journal. Read full text below, or click on the link here, Sharkey in Wall Street Journal

Europe Might Be No Investing Vacation

European Markets Won’t Benefit From Stimulus Right Away, She Says

By

Shefali Anand

Feb. 8, 2015 11:01 p.m. ET

With a rebound in Europe’s economies looking unlikely this year, Denver financial adviser Eileen Sharkey has this to say about international investments: Proceed with caution.

The European Central Bank in late January announced plans to pump more than $1 trillion in new money into eurozone economies to help spur growth, similar to what the U.S. Federal Reserve did in the U.S. amid the financial crisis. But it could take years for the flood of money to help some economies and their stock markets, Ms. Sharkey says.

Eileen Sharkey.
Eileen Sharkey. Photo: Edward DeCroce
Joel Javer.
Joel Javer. Photo: Edward DeCroce

“Things that are in trouble are generally cheap and attractive, but it may take a while for the dust to settle,” says Ms. Sharkey, co-founder of financial advisers Sharkey, Howes & Javer Inc.

The firm’s investment team is closely monitoring investments in the region, and if there are signs of declines, it would look to cut its international stock allocation by as much as half. Last year, the advisers bought an international fund that hedges against foreign-currency risk and thus loses less value as the U.S. dollar strengthens. “We believe the dollar will continue to get stronger” this year, says Joel Javer, co-founder of the firm.

In this column we feature model portfolios from prominent investment advisers. Ms. Sharkey co-founded the firm in 1990 with Lawrence Howes, as well as Mr. Javer. The firm currently manages around $750 million.

For clients who can handle moderate risk, the firm allocates 12% to developed foreign stocks, which include investments outside Europe such as Japan. If technical trends indicate that their international fund is poised to lose value, they would look to trim it, says Mr. Javer.

Here, the advisers share a model portfolio suitable for clients who can handle moderate risk.

The portfolio’s weighted average expense ratio is 0.56%, and the portfolio was up 12% annually for the five years endedDec. 31, according to Mr. Javer. That was before the firm’s investment-management fee, which is 1% or less of assets under management.

Ms. Anand is markets and finance editor for The Wall Street Journal in India. Email her at shefali.anand@wsj.com.

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‘Bird’ on the Street from George Ho

See more of George’s bird photos in his two classes:

‘Make Your Own Photo Book’ on Thursdays from 1 am-3 pm,
and ‘Making and Sharing End-of-Life Choices’ on Thursdays from 10 am-Noon.

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Since his retirement two years ago as a practicing physician, George Ho., Jr. is now “For the Birds.”

Blue Grosbeak 01
Blue Grosbeak by George Ho, Jr.

As a rheumatologist with training in hospice and palliative care medicine for 40 years, he celebrates his retirement by teaching his course at The Academy and taking photos.

“I combine my interests in wildlife, photography and hiking into these bird photos,” says Dr. Ho.

He prints them on different types of media: canvas, metal, acrylic and glass. “It adds a dimension in presenting and enjoying them.” He also enjoys making photo books (albums) and giving them to family and friends.

George volunteers at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge where he leads “the bike the refuge” nature program in the Spring and Fall and takes photos of special events at the RMANWR. His work appeared there in March 2015.

American Kestrel by George Ho, Jr.
American Kestrel by George Ho, Jr.

 

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Bil Buhler: Geek Turned Artist

 

Cherry Creek Arts FestivalBil Buhler (aka “Mr. Pots”)

Bil discovered the joy of making pottery more than 30 years ago when living in the Chicago area. After moving to Denver and while working in the computer industry, he earned a master’s degree in Computer Information Systems from the University of Denver.  Making pottery gave Bil a creative outlet vastly different from the technical requirements of his job.

When he retired, his avocation as a potter became his new life’s work. He wishes he had switched much sooner, he says, since he has such fun with his creations. “My favorite functional forms are bowls—bowls with elegant lines, full of rhythm and gesture.” Buhler’s work has been accepted into multiple juried art shows. For more on his art, see http://www.bilbuhler.com.

On the Academy Board, he serves as President.

 

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Academy Helps “Rescope” CU Prof’s Webcast

In fall 2012, were you one of the Academy participants who peppered Dr. Darin Toohey with questions after his lecture on short-lived climate forcers, in the CU Science: At the Cutting Edge course? If so, you might have helped shape Darin’s revised presentation on that topic to 4000 online viewers, a few weeks later.Darin Toohey, CU-Boulder, Science classes, adults

Darin recently emailed Academy coordinator Donna Barrow about a live webcast at a State Department outreach event at the Doha (Qatar) climate change conference (COP18). He wrote, “I changed my talk in response to the outstanding questions that I was asked by Academy participants. . . . and I thank your members for helping me ‘rescope’ this talk so that it was useful for a broader audience.”

To learn more about human-originated gases and particles called short-lived climate forcers and Darin’s work to reduce the climate changes they trigger, view his full webcast at http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/27347154.

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