Fall 2015

HISTORY

HIDDEN HEROES OF THE HOLOCAUST
Course Leaders: Anita Fricklas, Judy Schwartz
6 Tuesdays, Sept 29-Nov 3
$60
Video, discussion, guest speakers

Many of us have heard of Oscar Schindler and “Kindertransport.” These celebrated people and movements are heroes of the Holocaust for the special work they did to save many Jews from destruction. But did you ever hear of Julian Bilecki, whose valiant efforts helped 23 people to live undetected for almost two years in bunkers underground? Bilecki, Gisela Perl and Nicky Winton are among many who left their own homes, jobs and families to rescue the endangered from harm’s way. Meet the people from then and today’s world, who aren’t famous or world class, but who stepped beyond their own lives because of a need to make the world a better place.

REQUIRED READING:
Wiesenthal, Simon. Sunflower. Schoken, 1997
Watch or read at least one book or film about the Holocaust.

Anita Fricklas’ career included many years as Director of Education at Temple Sinai and Executive Director of the American Jewish Committee. Anita has received many awards for her work in diversity, advocacy and bigotry reduction.  Judy Schwartz is a career teacher and counselor having taught at Temple Sinai and Denver’s East High School, where she also coached the speech and debate team.  Over the years Judy has taught in the Philippines and in Guadalajara, Mexico.

THE CONSTITUTION, THE BILL OF RIGHTS, AND THE CIVIL WAR AMENDMENTS
Course Leader: Steve Bernard
6 Thursdays, Sept 24-Nov 5  (SKIP Oct 8)
1-3 pm
$70
Lecture, Q&A

Learn about and discuss our founding documents and historical contexts of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Civil War Amendments. Discover how courts have looked at the way in which they interact to resolve important issues over time including slavery’s long shadow over American society; the expansion of individual rights over time; and the sometimes difficult balancing act of weighing individual rights against group interests.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Stewart, David O. The Summer of 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution (The Simon & Schuster America Collection), 2008.

Amar, Akhill Reed. The Bill of Rights: Creation and Reconstruction .Yale University Press, 2000.
Peters, William. A More Perfect Union. Crown, 1987.

Judge Steven Bernard served as a prosecutor for 29 years and now presides on the Colorado Court of Appeals, getting up-close and personal with the Constitution.

THE POETRY OF WAR: CULTURE, POLITICS, AND THE HUMAN HEART
Course Leader: Connie Hyde
7 Tuesdays, Sept. 29-Nov. 10
1-3 pm
$70
Lecture, video, discussion

From the windy plains of Homer’s Troy to the deserts of Iraq, from British music halls to the trenches of World War I, from the music of the protest movement to the jungles of Vietnam—poetry emerges from the crucible of war. Through the lens of poetry, discuss the social attitudes, political aims, inherited myths, and cultural strains that shaped those conflicts. Take a look at war history, but from a different angle. Do attitudes toward war change or endure; are there legitimate uses of propaganda; how do we reconcile preservation of social ideals with the awful waste of war; is there a structural violence in organized societies that makes war inevitable; what are the uses of poetry in the face of carnage? Our storytellers are the poets. With irony and humor, skepticism and innocence, they teach us that each poem is both universal and a reflection of its time.

After college days immersed in literature, Connie Hyde spent several decades in commercial real estate law and raising children. She is enthusiastically devoted to her first loves of literature, history, politics, music and art.

AMERICAN PRESIDENTS THROUGH THE EYES OF THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE
Course Leader: Dick Young
7 Wednesdays, Sept 30-Nov 11
10-noon
$70
Lecture, participation, discussion

You will leave this class as a thoroughly historically informed voter. You should come prepared to discuss your favorite presidents, and your least favorite ones. Or if you’d like, sit back and listen or add your comments as we go through the history of our Presidents, from George Washington to Barack Obama. We will review each President–how he was nominated, elected and served as President. What Presidential powers did each bring to office? Learn about the birth of our political parties, their growth and how they changed over the years. Examine our unique Electoral College, how it came into being and is still being used today.

Retired Admiral, lawyer, and political leader, Dick Young has taught courses on Pearl Harbor, the Pacific War, and American history at various Elderhostels and continuing education programs of several universities. He was recently awarded with the Friar Foundation’s inaugural Lincoln award for his work as a veteran’s advocate.

CONSTANTINE’S SWORD: ANTI-SEMITISM & THE CATHOLIC CHURCH
Course Leader: Ralph Stern
8 Tuesdays, Sept 29-Nov 17
1-3 pm
$70
Lecture based on book, mostly discussion

Anti-Semitism’s long history is laid out in the book Constantine’s Sword by the ex-priest James Carroll. Studying this won’t be an easy journey, as the relationship between Judaism and the Catholic Church has been anything but tranquil from the times of the New Testament right up to the 20th century. But in discussing this legacy, including the church’s connection to the Holocaust, we will come to a better understanding of the roots of the hostility, which can be traced back to the Crusades and beyond. Embedded in this fascinating history is Carroll’s growing discomfort with Catholicism and the changes he wishes to make in its dogma. Please be forewarned, we will be discussing the inerrancy of the Bible. Will the author, despite his own conflicted attitudes toward the church, persuade you that the future promises repentance and rapprochement? This is a repeat of a popular Academy course.

REQUIRED READING:
Carroll, James. Constantine’s Sword: The Church and the Jews–A History. Mariner Books, 2002

Ralph Stern has spent the past 45 years reading about theology, theodicy and comparative religion.  In 1986 he entered the Jewish Theological Seminary and received a Masters in Jewish Philosophy.

THE ROMAN EMPIRE: 900 YEARS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD
Course Leader: Shellie Hochstadt
4 Wednesdays, Oct 28-Nov 18
10-noon
$45
Lecture, discussion

Over 900 years, from Republic through Imperial Rome, Roman history shaped Western culture as we know it, but how? This story contains military genius, democratic failure, economic power, gravitas, hedonism, justice and cruelty. What forces changed an insulated republic into a great empire? Explore the dynamic changes in governments, social structures, politics, religion, architecture, and war. The history of Rome is a compelling and enlightening story. You’re in luck! This will repeat the information in the previously sold-out course from Spring 2015.

Shellie Hochstadt taught world history, government and economics until her retirement in 2010. She combines her interests in history, travel and reading into her teaching, where she endeavors to bring a thoughtful global perspective.

RUSSIA 2015:
IN SEARCH OF A USABLE PAST
Course Leader: Dr. Mary Schaeffer Conroy
5 Thursdays, Oct 22-Nov 19
10-noon
$60
Lecture

“Usable past” is a term coined by western historians of Russia to explain contemporary Russians’ preoccupation–nay obsession–with finding out the truth about their past. For example, Russians learned in school that everything was bad “before the Great October Revolution (1917).” When the archives were opened to historians in the late 1980s, Russian historians learned otherwise. This search for an identifiable past comes in many forms: 1) World War II in the Post-Soviet Russia; 2) Civil Society in Late Imperial Russia and during World War I; 3) Medical Care, especially dentistry, pharmacy and pharmaceutical industry; 4) Marginal People, including those with disabilities and minorities; and 5) Business in Imperial Russia–and the USSR. Dr. Conroy’s worldwide acclaim for this topic will add scope and depth to your knowledge of this mysterious country that has been both our friend and our foe.

REQUIRED READING:
Prof. Conroy has a book by a Russia historian that she can sell in class for a minimal amount–proceeds to the Russian historian.
World expert on late imperial Russia, Dr. Mary Schaeffer Conroy has given numerous lectures in the USSR. She has published several books and is an emeritus Professor at the University of Colorado, Denver.

THE INQUISITIONS:
YES, MORE THAN ONE!
Course Leader: Walt Meyer
5 Thursdays, Oct 8-Nov 5
1-3 pm
$55
Lectures, reading, discussion

While the Spanish Inquisition may be the best known, there have been plenty of other persecutions of heretics and naysayers since Medieval times. We’ll probe this complex and troubling history with the help of God’s Jury, a book by Cullen Murphy, who has mined a mountain of archival material recently released by the Vatican. With a combination of vivid immediacy and learned analysis Murphy puts a human face on a familiar but little-known piece of our past and argues that only by understanding the Inquisition, with its techniques of surveillance, censorship and interrogation, can we hope to explain the making of the present. This is a repeat of a popular course.

RECOMMENDED READING:
Murphy, Cullen. God’s Jury: The Inquisition and the Making of the Modern World. Mariner, 2013.

Walt Meyer, a “retired technocrat,” enjoys sharing his research into the historical, political, and religious roots of relations between Muslim cultures and the West.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & MEDICINE

MASS EXTINCTIONS:
CAUSES AND EFFECTS
Course Leader: Larry Matten
9 Tuesdays,Sept 22-Nov 17
1-3 pm
$80
Lecture

Extinction is a part of the normal history of life on Earth. However, there are a number of distinct events that have led to extraordinary losses of life, as much as 95 percent of all species dying within a short period of time. The first life forms that crawled onto the Earth subsequently changed the environment, which lead to the first great mass extinction, and four more that occurred in the last five billion years. These extinctions led to the rise of groups that dominated the planet, and, in turn, went extinct. Are there patterns associated with mass extinctions? Are survivors endowed with specific qualities or is survival just good fortune? Are we living through a mass extinction right now?

Larry Matten wears many hats: teacher, paleobotanist, administrator, lawyer and researcher. Above all, Larry loves teaching about his favorite subject – paleontology and evolution. He has spent over 55 years studying and researching the fossil record. Some of his previous subjects taught include:Darwin,human evolution,amazing fossils and the Stories They Tell,andPaleontology.

CUTTING EDGE MEDICAL RESEARCH FROM THE ANSCHUTZ CAMPUS
Course Leader: Woody Emlen
Speakers: Various experts from Anschutz Medical Campus
6 Tuesdays (5 lectures, 1 field trip TBD, 1 SKIP TBD) Sept 29-Nov 10
10-noon
$65
Lecture, Q&A

Here in Colorado, we are fortunate to have a premier medical research institution in our backyard: Anschutz Medical Campus. Join us as researchers from Anschutz present some of the exciting research that is happening in our own neighborhood. This class is a continuation of the class offered in Spring 2015 but brings us completely new speakers. We will also again offer a field trip to a site to be determined on campus!

Speakers from Anschutz Medical Campus will include: Dr. Wendy Kohrt, Professor of Geriatric Medicine speaking on Aging Well; Dr. Huntington Potter, Professor of Neuroscience speaking on Alzheimer’s Disease; and Dr. David Goff, Dean of the School of Public Health speaking on the Current State of Health in America.

The course is a collaboration between the Academy of Lifelong Learning and the Office of Development at Anschutz Medical Campus. Dr. Woody Emlen, a former Professor of Medicine and Immunology at CU Health Sciences Center coordinates the course for the Academy.

MIND MATTERS: MENTAL HEALTH FOR THIS TIME OF LIFE
Course Leader: Dr. Kip Doran
8 Thursdays, Sept 24-Nov 12
10-noon
$75
Lecture, discussion, Q&A

Mature adults experience significant life changes: retirement, health issues and loss to name a few. Many of these changes have emotional and mental health components which can at times disrupt emotional equilibrium. Get the facts from an expert on the common mental and emotional issues facing individuals in the latter stages of their lives, and their remedies. Topics will include: Depression and Suicide; Anxiety, Fears and Panic Attacks; Alzheimer’s Disease; the Mental Response to Life Trauma; Grief and Grieving; Solving Loneliness and Boredom; Substance Abuse; and Finding Happiness. Learn about the many common myths and truths about mental conditions, finding competent help and support, the best uses of talking therapy and/or medication, and how to assist others with emotional issues.

RECOMMENDED READING:
A list will be provided.

Dr. Christopher “Kip” Doran, a graduate of Boston College and Yale Medical School s a Clinical Professor at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. Having authored two mental health textbooks, he has taught throughout the US and in six foreign countries.

MUSIC

FEMALE SONGWRITERS OF A GENERATION: JONI MITCHELL
TO BONNIE RAITT
Course Leader: Paul Turelli
8 Wednesdays, Sept 30-Nov 18
1-3 pm
$70
Lecture, video, listening to music, discussion

More often than not, most people think of Lennon, McCartney or Bob Dylan as the great singer-songwriters of our era. But learn about the vast array of great female songwriters: Joni Mitchell emerged from the folk world of Joan Baez; Carole King quietly wrote hit after hit; Carly Simon dominated the Top 40 for a legendary moment; while Aretha Franklin, Emmylou Harris, and Loretta Lynn made a new genre for themselves. Bonnie Raitt took the rough and tumble sound of the blues and made it her own–and not just for herself but for countless other women. While this class will not be strictly chronological, nor limited to one particular genre, you will listen to and learn about a wide range of voices that had profound impact on our era as well as on each of us individually. Explore a bit of biography, musical history, sociology and political shifts during our era, the power of lyrics and of new sounds, as well as the abundance of genius female songwriters of our time.

Paul Turelli, a retired middle school teacher and administrator from Littleton Public Schools has a vast interest in literature and history. His has taught the Academy about “Bob Dylan: Poet and Prophet.”

MUSIC THEORY AND LITERACY
Course Leader: Robin McNeil
8 Tuesdays, Sept 22-Nov 17, (SKIP Oct 6)
10-noon
$70
Lecture, discussion

Beethoven once said, “Tones sound, and roar and storm about me until I have set them down in notes.” Learn why music sounds the way it does. Why are there scales, cord functions, harmonic forms, architectural forms, and music terms. You’ll also understand what music theory and music literacy are. This class is not difficult, and it will be enjoyable. Get the basics of music that you missed in your first year at the university.

See Robin’s bio info below.

MUSIC OF THE AVANT-GARDE
Course Leader: Robin McNeil
8 Wednesdays Sept 30-Nov 18 (Please note  ONE class will take place TUESDAY, Oct 13 FROM 1-3PM)
10-noon
$70
Lecture, discussion

The avant-garde means NOW. So, when did the avant-garde period begin? What did Arnold Schoenberg do that sets him forever in a special category? Who are the composers that followed him into the modern era? Who were the composers that were considered to be modernists before the avant-garde? These composers’ thoughts and objectives will be discussed, and you will learn why music has been the slowest art to change.

Concert pianist Robin McNeil taught at the University of Illinois and the University of South Dakota, in addition to serving as executive director of the Denver Philharmonic Orchestra

BRILLIANTLY BAROQUE!
MUSIC FROM RENAISSANCE-1750
Course Leader: Lorraine Sherry, Various speakers
6 Thursdays, Oct. 8-Nov. 12
1-3 pm
$65
Lecture, Q&A

There has always been music. From David dancing and singing before the Lord, to Greeks, Monks, and Medici, and lo! There was the Renaissance and its beautiful music. Over the past 30 years, the Boulder/Denver metro area has become one of the most important centers for the current “Renaissance” of early music performance. Learn where and how our local music directors found early music manuscripts, including about 250 years of vocal music from rich polyphony to harmony; how musical forms and styles evolved from early Renaissance to late Baroque; the birth of the orchestra and development of musical instruments; the growth and refinement of opera from musical drama; and the art and excitement of performing early music on authentic old instruments, many of which you’ll never see in a modern orchestra.
Rub shoulders with six local, world-class musicians who have sung, played, or directed choral and instrumental music of the Renaissance and Baroque periods throughout the USA and Europe internationally.
Week 1 -Frank Nowell: Harpsicordist-Artistic Director, Baroque Chamber Orchestra of Colorado: “The Birth of the Orchestra.”
Week 2 -Robin McNeil: Course Leader, The Academy: “Baroque Music from Beginnings to Bach.”
Week 3-Peter Schimpf: Associate Professor and Chair of the Music Department at Metropolitan State University; founder of Metro State’s Early Music Ensemble: “The Birth of Opera.”
Week 4 -Thomas Edward Morgan: Artistic Director and Conductor, Ars Nova Singers: “Tapestries of Sound.”
Week 5- Zachary Carrettin: Violin Soloist and Music Director, Boulder Bach Festival: “J.S. Bach’s compositions for unaccompanied violin and cello.”
Week 6- Evanne Browne: Artistic Director, Seicento Baroque Ensemble; Singer with a specialty in baroque music performance; Music Director, First Presbyterian Church, Boulder: Topic TBD.

REQUIRED READING:
Lorraine’s Website, which is dedicated to this course, http://tinyurl.com/brilliantly-baroque
Lorraine Sherry, whom we affectionately call the “Academy Map Maven,” has a double life. Her passion has always been music–primarily singing –and she has sung with many professional groups and universities, and looks forward to introducing you to the many speakers presenting, many of whom she has worked with.

GREAT VOICES IN OPERA:
CARUSO TO CALLAS
Course Leader: Don Culp
5 Wednesdays, Oct 21-Nov 18
1-3 pm
$55
Lecture, listen to great singing, discussion

We’ll examine six opera stars: Enrico Caruso, Feodor Chaliapin, Lawrence Tibbett, Rosa Ponselle, Jussi Bjorling, and Maria Callas, whose singing style and distinctive personalities developed and transformed the art of opera. Through music and video, find out how these virtuosos raised the standards of vocal performance, acting, and dramatic presentation. These performers influenced and radically changed both how opera was presented and what the public expected. Repeat course from Fall 2014-don’t miss out!

Don Culp was in sales and sales management and also managed The Magic Castle in Hollywood. He has studied singers and the art of singing since 1970.

MALE JAZZ VOCALISTS:
THEIR CAREERS, BANDS & RECORDS
Course Leader: Lorenz Rychner
6 Thursdays, Sept 24-Nov 19
(SKIP Oct 15, 22, 29)
10-noon
$60
Lecture, music, video, discussion

Another in Rychner’s popular series of Jazz classes, this one featuring a selection of male Jazz vocalists: Hear, watch, and learn about crooners and swingers throughout the history of Jazz, from Crosby to Armstrong, Eckstine to Sinatra, and many more recent ones you may be glad to discover. We’ll compare styles and influences, watch historic footage, and try to keep our tapping toes in check.

Lorenz Rychner worked as a professional musician in Australia for 15 years before moving to LA to study orchestration and conducting and head the music synthesis program at the Grove School of Music.

SKILLS

BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS
INTO THE DIGITAL REALM
Course Leader: Doug Wilke
4 Wednesdays, Oct 7-28
1-3 pm
$40
Lecture, demonstration

You are traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. A journey into a wondrous land of imagination. Next stop, the Digital Realm! The computer, television and smart phone are now your photo album. Take your family photos and slides by learning from demonstrations, including: the basics of using a flatbed scanner; emphasizing file types and resolution; using Picasa software (free!), organizing, editing, captioning, and using special effects and collages. Create albums of photos and save them to various applications forever, without fear of flood and fire. Give them to friends and family on a DVD or flash drive.

Doug Wilke’s father had a large collection of old family photos and documents to donate to a home town museum. But first, Doug taught himself to scan and digitize this collection for TV and web sharing. He has now saved photos through 1950, and looks forward to sharing his skills with you.

TAKE BETTER PHOTOS: A WORKSHOP FOR ALL WHO TAKE PICTURES
Course Leader: Bob Adelstein
6 Thursdays, Sept 24-Oct 29
10-noon
$55
Lecture, discussion, participants’ pictures

Had a Kodak (or iPhone) moment lately? Take good pictures, from your first look through a viewfinder to the final printed image. Discuss basic theory and technical aspects of photography, and learn how to use a camera properly, tell a story visually, and edit and print pictures so they reflect what you see in your mind’s eye.

Participants will take photos prior to the start of class and each week thereafter, which will be gently critiqued. Repeat from Spring 2015.

BEFORE CLASS:
Please email your favorite photos to Bob, robertad@sprynet.com.

Bob Adelstein, a licensed psychotherapist in private practice, has been taking pictures since he was 12 years old and still owns the box camera that he used back then. He has self-published two books.

TECH TIPS
Course Leader: Scott Henke
6 Wednesdays, Oct 7-Nov 18,
(SKIP OCT 28)
10-noon
FIRST CLASS FREE WITH MEMBERSHIP.
Single class: $10, members. $13, nonmembers
All 6 weeks: $50, members. $78, nonmembers

Oct 7-Basic Computer Terms and Troubleshooting (FREE CLASS)
This is a free class even if you are not signed up for the entire Tech Series. Get the basics of computer terminology and troubleshooting your equipment, and talk about when to buy a new computer and when to fix one. You’ll get an overview of the rest of the weeks’ classes.

Oct 14-How to: Online Shopping with CraigsList, Ebay, Quibids & Consumer Reports
We are all consumers, whether we shop over the Internet or in a store. This class shows you how to make smart decisions using reviews such as Consumer Reports. Once you are armed with research, learn to safely shop on eBay, CraigsList, Quibids, Amazon and others.

Oct 21-iBought an iPad, Now What?
Bring your iPad for this informative class on how to get started with the iPad and its features! This is only for iPad owners, not any other tablet brand.

Oct 28-Travel Class, Planning Your Trip: Plane Fares, Car Rental & Hotels
After you’ve decided where you’d like to travel, learn the different ways to book travel online, make car reservations and read hotel reviews before booking. Save time, money and lots of frustration!

Nov 4-Travel Class Part 2, What to Do, Maps & Discounts
Now what to do once you get there? Review ALL of the items from the first travel class, and get more detail on each Website. You can learn more about your destination, picking restaurants, mapping and discounts.

Nov 11-Internet Pitfalls and Quicksand
The Internet can be a scary place with spyware, hoaxes, identity theft and hackers. You can easily protect yourself with just a few easy steps and a little useful information. A MUST for every internet user, this new class could save you money!

Onsite Consulting owner, Scott Henke, has been a consultant for 32 years. His company offers PC consulting, network troubleshooting, repair, virus and spyware solutions, free off-site backup, remote emergency help and more. He is available for free advice via email scott@henke.com

COLORADO CPR’S HEART SAVER
FIRST AID: CERTIFICATION
Thursday, Oct 1
OR Wednesday, Nov 18 (sign up for only one)
10 am – 3 pm (includes lunch break)
$45, includes book and certification
Each Workshop limited to 15 participants

Get certified in adult, child, and infant CPR, the cardiopulmonary resuscitation technique that has helped save the lives of countless heart attack victims. This one-day, five-hour session teaches you how to perform chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth breathing, with emphasis on the ABCs of Airway, Breathing, and Circulation. You’ll practice with mannequins and see a demonstration of the automated external defibrillator (AED), which can restart a stalled heartbeat through electrical stimulation. Wear comfortable clothes since much of the individual practice will take place on the floor.

As a nonprofit American Heart Association Training Center covering Colorado and Wyoming, the Colorado CPR Association coordinates trainings for both instructors and those needing certification. For more information, visit www.cocprassn.com.

CHATTING IN ESPAÑOL: BEGINNER II
Course Leader: Dr. Linda Gordon
6 Wednesdays, Sept 30-Nov 11
(SKIP Nov 4)
1-3 pm
$55
Vocabulary, Conversation

The Beginning/Intermediate class is for those who have taken some Spanish, but want to “brush up” on grammar and vocabulary and keep building conversational skills. Gain greater confidence in this musical and increasingly important language. Participants should be comfortable with the present tense, familiar with the past tenses and ready to sharpen their communication skills through reading, speaking and listening. Class max  is 14. Is this class a fit? Llámame at (303) 399-8241.

REQUIRED READING:
Participants must buy their own book. Richmond, Dorothy. Practice Makes Perfect Spanish Verb Tenses, McGraw-Hill, 2010. It’s usually under $15.

An educator for 36 years, Dr. Linda Gordon retired recently from being a school principal. As the former director of an English-as-a-second-language school in Mexico City for 10 years, she’s excited about working with adults who want to learn.

CHATTING IN ESPAÑOL INTERMEDIATE
Course Leader: Sandy Stolar
8 Wednesdays, Sept 30-Nov 18
1-3 pm
$70
Vocabulary, Conversation

¡Continuamos la conversación! The class will be conducted primarily in Spanish, with pauses to look at some important grammar. Themed conversations will build vocabulary and the confidence to speak in complete sentences in real-life situations. Si tú puedes pedir una margarita, describir las cosas que más te gustan, y preguntar como llegar al museo and want to dust it off and trot it out—and have a lot of fun doing it—esta es la clase para ti. Limited to 12 participants. To see if this class is a fit for you, llámame at (303) 708-9716.

REQUIRED READING:
Participants must buy their own book. Richmond, Dorothy. Practice Makes Perfect Spanish Verb Tenses, McGraw-Hill, 2010. It’s usually under $15.

Sandy Stolar taught Spanish for 25 years in middle school, high school and community college. She has traveled extensively in Mexico, Spain and South America.

WATERCOLORS: FURTHUR EXPLORE YOUR ART ESCAPE
Course Leader: Sharon Rouse
5 Tuesdays, Sept 29-Oct 27
9:30 am -12:30 pm
$60
Hands-on Workshop, *Prerequisite

Novices and seasoned artists alike will enjoy using their growing creativity and watercolor skills. As we further explore concepts, techniques, color and application techniques, we will have the tools to help us push our personal boundaries. After registration, you will receive a list of suggested materials. Limited to 20. *Prerequisite: Some watercolor experience. Please note early start, late end.

Sharon Rouse’s skills as an experienced teacher of adult classes and workshops guide her as she works with students of various skill experiences.  Her work appears in various shows and private collections.

BRIDGE: A BLITZKRIEG REVIEW
OF THE BASICS
COURSE LEADER: Sally Kneser
6 Tuesdays, Oct 13-Nov 17
12:45-3 pm
Lecture,Q&A
$65
Exercises, Practice Hands

All bridge players can benefit from a review of the basics and this fast-paced interactive course makes it more fun. In the first hour sample hands are displayed so that everyone can decide which bid is the best. Then, using an Audience Response System, participants vote for what they believe is the correct answer. The class results are displayed as a chart. Explanations are offered and participants are reminded of rule after rule. The second hour provides MANY opportunities to challenge your play of the hand. This is NOT a class for NEVER-EVERS. Note the early start time.

BRIDGE: CEMENTING YOUR
2 OVER 1 BIDDING CONVENTIONS
COURSE LEADER: Sally Kneser
3 Wednesdays, Sept 30-Oct 14
12:45-3 pm
Lecture,Q&A
$35
Exercises, Practice Hands

The 2 Over 1 Game Force system is here to stay. It is not a passing fad. But there are many options on how to play it. Those who have already learned the 2 over 1 system will enjoy this review of the most important agreements. The lessons involve many “How-to” situations: suit preference, shape, limit raise, bigger hand, slam interest, an ace or king, 5 or 6 card major as responder, a pre-emptive raise, and more. If you’ve not yet learned 2 over 1, be sure to learn it before the course begins because this is a review course, not a course for those who want to learn the system. It’s a great opportunity for partners to cement their agreements. Note the early start time.

Everyone’s favorite bridge instructor, Sally Kneser takes her passion for bridge to the classroom with humor, patience and clarity. She is a member of two book clubs, a grandma and the former Director of The Academy.

RECOMMENDED READING:
Cohen, Larry. Larry Teaches 2 Over 1 Game Forcing, 2012.
Grant, Audrey & Eric Rodwell. 2 Over 1 Game Force, Baron Barclay, 2009.

LITERATURE & WRITING

THE POETRY OF WAR: CULTURE, POLITICS, AND THE HUMAN HEART
Course Leader: Connie Hyde
7 Tuesdays, Sept. 29-Nov. 10
1-3 pm
$70
Lecture, video, discussion

From the windy plains of Homer’s Troy to the deserts of Iraq, from British music halls to the trenches of World War I, from the music of the protest movement to the jungles of Vietnam—poetry emerges from the crucible of war. Through the lens of poetry, discuss the social attitudes, political aims, inherited myths, and cultural strains that shaped those conflicts. Take a look at war history, but from a different angle. Do attitudes toward war change or endure; are there legitimate uses of propaganda; how do we reconcile preservation of social ideals with the awful waste of war; is there a structural violence in organized societies that makes war inevitable; what are the uses of poetry in the face of carnage? Our storytellers are the poets. With irony and humor, skepticism and innocence, they teach us that each poem is both universal and a reflection of its time.

See Connie’s bio under “History.”

WRITE TO SAVE YOUR LIFE
Course Leader: Patricia Cox
6 Tuesdays, Sept 22-Oct 27
10-noon
$55
Interactive writing workshop

“Anyone who physically and emotionally outlasts childhood has something to write about forever,” offers author Lou Willett Stanek. You’ll agree once you discover the rich vein of topics in your past and experience the joy of preserving these treasured tales. We’ll share and encourage each other in class and tackle some writing at home. Reading your stories aloud will prove a powerful affirmation, and listening to others as they share theirs is an effective way to improve your own writing. Join this group, capped at 12, to learn how to transform your cherished memories into your memoirs. This is a repeat of a Spring 2015 workshop and earlier courses.

RECOMMENDED READING:
Stanek, Lou Willett, Writing Your Life. Collins, 1996
Thomas, Frank. How to Write the Story of Your Life. Writers’ Digest Books, 1989

Patricia Cox has taught writing for the Denver Public Schools and Cherry Creek School District. She has published three books, the most recent is I’m Sorry…What Was the Question?

WRITING YOUR LIFE STORIES
Course Leader: Kathy Boyer
6 Thursdays, Sept 24-Oct 29
10-noon
$55
Interactive writing workshop

Whether you’re 19 or 90, you have stories to tell and wisdom to share. Learn how to begin compiling a collection of your life experiences to share with friends and family—or simply to read later at leisure. Spark your memory with innovative and engaging activities designed to bring to mind long-forgotten scenes from your past and to help you start getting them down on paper. Pick up your pen and open a new chapter in your life in the supportive atmosphere of this popular class. Limited to 13 participants. Repeat of popular Academy course.

Kathy Boyer, a retired teacher, has conducted Life Stories workshops for libraries, summer camps, churches, community centers, and the Academy. She also works one-on-one to help people record their memories electronically.

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN
SHORT STORIES
Course Leader: Paulette Wasserstein
6 Wednesdays, Sept 30-Nov 11
(SKIP Nov 4)
1-3 pm
$60
Discussion, Reading

Explore fascinating stories with participation-friendly discussions. If you love great literature, you will appreciate the artistry that goes into the creation of the short prose found in The Best American Short Stories 2012, edited by Tom Perrotta. Each week, the class examines one or two memorable stories, teasing out the meanings of each story and building a greater understanding of the short story as an art form. Because the short stories are written by contemporary authors, their subject matter and dilemmas cannot fail to stir great questions and evoke new insights about the world in which we live.

RECOMMENDED READING:
Perotta, Tom (ed.), The Best American Short Stories 2012. Mariner Books, 2012.

Dr. Paulette Wasserstein, career teacher of English and education consultant, loves the exchange of ideas and sharing “a good read.”

ART

INDIE FILM INSPIRATION
Course Leader: Paul Turelli
9 Tuesdays, Sept 22-Nov 17
1-3 pm
$75
Lecture, video, discussion

Hollywood is becoming less likely the place where the movie you are watching was made. International and foreign films and independent film companies are winning more awards and capturing larger audiences. Bring out your inner Roger Ebert (or Siskell) for these four films: Poetry is a heartwarming and moving South Korean film (subtitled) that addresses the challenges of aging in a powerfully artistic approach. Dimensions is a beautifully directed, innovative cinematic mystery shot in 1920’s England, with science fiction overtones. The Athlete is a true story of the Ethiopian shepherd who won the 1960 Olympic Gold and his subsequent achievements. North of the Sun is stunningly filmed in the extreme isolation of f the Northern coast of Norway and addresses a wide range of global and ecological issues. Note that a week of film viewing will alternate with a week of review and discussion.

Paul Turelli, a retired middle school teacher and administrator from Littleton Public Schools has a vast interest in literature and history. His has taught the Academy about “Bob Dylan: Poet and Prophet.”

DUTCH MASTERS III:
AGE OF REMBRANDT
Course Leader: Billie Day
7 Tuesdays, Sept 29-Nov 10
1-3 pm
$65
Video followed by discussion, art viewing

Naturalistic landscape painting was a Dutch specialty that was influential throughout Europe, leading to realistic landscapes later. These paintings will come alive with a DVD lecture series that will initially take a brief look at historical painting, from religion, mythology, and political history. The remaining half of the course will be devoted to Rembrandt from his early to late paintings as well as his drawings and etchings. Conclude with a scenic tour of Rembrandt’s works at the National Gallery in London, reflecting the energy that produced his “soulful, honest, and deeply moving work.” If you loved the first two parts of this three-part series, or even if you haven’t attended before, you won’t want to miss this final class.

After living in Washington, DC, for over 30 years and teaching high school modern world history, Dr. Billie Day received a Fullbright-Hays scholarship to the Netherlands to study the art, history, and culture of that country. She has a PhD in education from NYU.

DANCE: THE UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE
Course Leader: Gloria Kubel
8 Tuesdays, Sept 22-Nov. 10
1-3 pm
$70
Lectures, Video, Discussion

From earliest times, people have danced as a part of life. Perhaps it was a way to experience one’s aliveness, perhaps it was a way to feel connected to a supreme power when asking for rain, fertility or a successful hunt. Study the beginnings of this art from the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Romantic Period and then fast forward years later when ballet was born in the royal court and brought to America–spawning modern dance. Look forward to viewing performances of both genres and discussing this art.

RECOMMENDED READINGS:
Freedman, Russell. Martha Graham, a Dancer’s Life. Clairion Books, 1998.
Gottlieb, Robert. George Ballanchine, The Ballet Maker. (Eminent Lives). Harper Perennial, 2010.
Tharp, Twyla & Reiter, Mark. The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life, 2006.

Gloria Kubel received a BA in Education from Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, New York and a MA in Dance from the University of Colorado. She studied ballet growing up in New York City and studied modern dance with Martha Graham, Hanya Holm, Erick Hawkins, Alwin Nikolais and Murray Louis. She taught modern dance in Denver for over twenty years and directing a small company of dancers, performed in several Colorado cities. Gloria created a movement-discussion-support group for women after breast cancer and continues to teach dance – exercise and tai chi movement meditation classes.

INTRO TO
JAPANESE CLASSICAL MOVIES
Course Leader: Dr. Hiroko Johnson
7 Wednesdays, Sept 30 –Nov 11
10-noon
$70
Video, discussion, Q &A

First-time visitors to the U.S. often expect Americans to be cowboys riding horses. Movies have always reflected culture as well as provided a view from the inside. Take an insider’s look at Japanese culture by watching some of the country’s classic films. The films from Kurozawa and Mifune, an internationally popular director and movie star, will be spotlighted and were chosen for their explanation of Japanese life and of male and female culture. This is a rare opportunity to experience another culture through the filmmaker’s lens.
An expert on the history of Japanese art, Dr. Hiroko Johnson taught for five years in the Los Angeles area and for 12 years at San Diego State University, where she was chosen the most influential professor in the College of Arts and Humanities.  The author of a book and many articles in both English and Japanese, she has taken groups of students to Japan and China on study tours.

DAM GREAT ART
-IN BLOOM, Exhibition visit Oct 7
-WYETHS: ANDREW AND JAMIE WYETH, Exhibition visit Nov 11
Course Leaders: Joanne Mendes, Marty Corren
1:30-3:30 pm
Note that each of these classes start later than others.
Guided group tour, printed materials
Limited to 28 per class
*Parking additional
*Tours take place at DAM
$7 per class for DAM MEMBERS
$20 per class for nonmembers of DAM

These are guided visits to two of the Denver Art Museum’s important exhibitions this summer and fall. A group of 10 will have a museum staff member or expert docent take small groups through the exhibitions. Max of 28 participants for each of the dates.

-IN BLOOM, Exhibition visit Oct. 7. This summer the entire Denver Art Museum is In Bloom! Join our expert guides for a tour through In Bloom: Painting Flowers in the Age of Impressionism, presenting the development of 19th-century French, floral-still life, including over 60 works by masters such as Edward Manet, Edgar Degas, Pierre-August Renoir, Paul Cézanne, and Vincent van Gogh. This is your last chance to see this beautiful exhibition before it closes in mid-October. You’ll have time after the tour to see some of the campus wide displays based on flower-related themes.

-ANDREW AND JAMIE WYETH, Exhibition visit Nov. 11. As this exhibition will have just opened you’ll be among the first to enjoy a guided tour of Wyeth: Andrew and Jamie in the Studio, which explores the connection between two artists, father and son, who are inextricably linked by their shared artistic habits of mind, while each maintains his own unique artistic voice. The exhibition organized by DAM, features more than 100 works in a variety of media: pen and ink, graphite, chalk, watercolor, tempera, oil and mixed media. The exhibition catalogue will be available in the museum shop.

Art Lovers Extraordinaire: Long-time art enthusiast Joanne Mendes retired from a career spent organizing programs in art history in London and at the DAM. The DAM’s Academy liaison, Marty Corren, joined the museum as a volunteer in 2006 and recently received the Cile Bach Award for outstanding work as a DAM docent.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

GOOD WORK!
PEOPLE SOLVING PROBLEMS
Course Leader: Sara Marsden, Various speakers
8 Wednesdays, Sept 30-Nov 18
10-noon
$70
Lecture, discussion, video

Good Work! will emphasize effective programs that are less like a charity and more like a movement. Representatives from selected organizations such as Project Cure, Global Volunteers and the Posner Center will discuss the good work they do to solve local and global issues. Each will address a specific problem and their success in addressing that problem. Speakers will provide useful information about ways to become involved as volunteers, letter writers, legislative participants, advocates or contributors. All of us want to know that our efforts, large or small, are directed toward meaningful groups with proven track records.

REQUIRED READING:
Kristof, Nicholas D. & Sheryl WuDunn. A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity. Knopf, 2014.

Sara Marsden became interested in world affairs through her mother Catherine’s dynamic world view. She studied at the University of Colorado and received Masters degrees from CSU and UCLA. Her interest resulted in a two-year stint in the Peace Corps in the Phillipines.

CIVIC IDENTITY: SAVING CULTURE THROUGH HISTORIC PRESERVATION
Course Leader: Georgi Contiguglia, various speakers
9 Thursdays, Sept 24-Nov 19
10-noon
$80
Lecture, discussion

Explore the successes and challenges of historic preservation in the 21st century. Nine sessions will feature stimulating presentations by leaders in Colorado’s field of historic preservation. Enjoy learning about preserving archaeological sites, historic architecture, neighborhoods and districts. Delve into the state’s innovative preservation tool kit and discuss the challenges of preserving our past while planning for our future. Consider the ways we can enrich our children’s appreciation for historic sites, infuse them with the preservation ethic, and stimulate them to create a future that incorporates the structures of our past to preserve Colorado’s civic identity.

WEEK 1- Why do We Preserve Places from our Past? Jim Hartmann,Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (ret.), History Colorado and Preservation Laws: a Brief Inventory, Georgianna Contiguglia, Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (ret.), History Colorado.

WEEK 2: Identifying and Documenting Our Historic Resources: The Colorado State Register of Historic Properties and the National Register of Historic Places, Astrid Liverman, PhD., National and State Register Coordinator, History Colorado; and Colorado’s “Certified Local Government” Preservation Program; Patrick Eidman, Planner, Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation, History Colorado.

WEEK 3: Colorado’s Scenic & Historic Byways Program, Lenore Bates, Director, Scenic & Historic Byways, Colorado Department of Transportation; and Sally Pearce, Co-Chair, National Scenic & Historic Byways Foundation.

WEEK 4: Preserving Archaeological Sites: Challenges and Successes, Susan Collins, PhD., Colorado State Archaeologist (ret.), History Colorado.

WEEK 5: Roadside Architecture, Lyle Miller, Colorado State Historical Fund (ret.), History Colorado.

WEEK 6: Mid-Century Modern Architecture – Preserving a More Recent Past, Janet Ore, PhD. History Department, Colorado State University.

WEEK 7: Show Me the Money!, Steve Turner, Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer, Director, State Historical Fund, History Colorado; and Life in the Preservation Trenches, Cynthia Neely, Executive Director, Georgetown Trust.

WEEK 8: Under the Golden Dome – Preserving Our State Capitol, Larry Friedberg, Colorado State Architect.

WEEK 9: Raising the Next Generation of Preservationists-Educating Our Youth about Historic Preservation, Ann Prizlaff, Chair, History Colorado Board of Directors and Michelle Pearson, Education Grants Coordinator, State Historical Fund, History Colorado.

Georgi Contiguglia was the Curator of Decorative and Fine Arts at the Colorado Historical Society before becoming its President and CEO. She has a Master’s Degree in art history and has worked at the Brooklyn Art Museum and the Denver Art Museum.  She recently won the Dana Crawford Award for Excellence in Preservation from Colorado Preservation, Inc.

MODERN FAMILY:
21ST CENTURY ISSUES
Course Leaders: Sheila Gutterman, Margot Alicks
4 Thursdays, Oct 29-Nov 19
1-3 pm
$45
Lecture, Q&A

Each week, a firm of family law attorneys will bring us up to date about hot topics in their area of law.

Week 1: Anatomy of a Divorce, Suzanne Griffiths and Ann Gushurst will discuss an overview of divorce in Colorado. They will show clips of their appearance on the Dr Phil Show and tell stories of filming their office and Hollywood.

Week 2: The Love Boat, Margot Alicks and Heather Broxterman present the types of Colorado marriages (gay, straight, common law), with statistics and relevant issues.

Week 3: Low Impact Divorce, Kristi Wells will describe the range of options available in Colorado, and discuss how friends and relatives can help parties going through the divorce process.

Week 4: Rocky Mountain High, Carolyn Witkus will discuss marijuana and the legal matters relating to the drug’s place in divorce (including dissipation, business valuation/sale, and parenting).

Sheila Gutterman and her award-winning colleagues at Gutterman Griffiths PC Family Law combine their areas of expertise to offer services, from effective trial strategies to collaboration and mediation, in order to provide cost effective and outstanding representation for the client’s individual needs.

DON’T MISS WHAT YOU MISSED: ‘GRAZING’ LAST TERM
Course Leaders and Guest Speakers
Organizers: Sheila Porter, Rosalie Goldman
8 Wednesdays, Sept 30 – Nov 18
1-3 pm
$75
Lecture

Opportunity awaits you to ‘graze’ through last term’s offerings and hear a single presentation from different classes representing seven different topics. Did you miss a class you wanted to take because of a schedule conflict? Have you always wanted to sample another area without committing to an entire term? Join us and hear about everything from Climate Change to Jazz, from the Middle East to Short Stories and many more topics. A smorgasbord awaits you. You will leave with a ‘doggie bag’ of new ideas and information.
Week 1: Climate Change, Jonathan Ormes.
Week 2: What’s Up Doc?, Woody Emlen.
Week 3: Great Decisions, Sara Marsden.
Week 4: Middle East and North Africa in Turmoil, Sherma Erholm.
Week 5: Town Hall, Rosalie Goldman.
Week 6: Underpinnings of Predjudice, Sheila Porter.
Week 7: Suburbs, Slums and Ghettos, Chuck Shannon.
Week 8: All That Jazz, Lorenz Rychner.

Sheila Porter, PhD, combines an art history degree with over 30 years’ experience as a clinical and forensic psychologist. Sheila chairs the Academy’s Curriculum Committee and volunteers with projects in Cambodia and Africa. Rosalie Goldman, a semi-retired special education teacher and community volunteer, has a life-long interest in current events, especially civil and human rights.

ECONOMICS

CRITICAL ECONOMIC ISSUES 201
Course Leader: Jim Kneser
4 Thursdays, Oct 29-Nov 19
1-3 pm
$60
Lecture, Q&A, *Prerequisite

Since the meltdown of 2008, the Academy’s Critical Economic Issues courses have focused on the new and complex economic challenges caused by the asset bubbles and busts, credit contraction, resulting steep recession, quantitative easing, and the painfully slow recovery of the 2007-14 period. Jim has clearly explained both the economic fundamentals involved and the (often unexpected) interactions of the fiscal and monetary policy choices that were made and implemented–all described without the mathiness and gobbledygook that many economists use to confuse/impress people. This fall, Jim is offering a new course that builds on the existing foundation presented over the past six years. It will address the significant choices among policy options that must now be made and implemented if the economy is to return to the robust secular growth trends of the past four decades. *To best appreciate the new material, potential registrants should have taken one of Jim’s Critical Economic Issues courses in the past three years. Those who don’t qualify, but still wish to register can petition Jim directly for approval at info@academyll.org (no blood test this time).

See Jim’s bio info below.

THE AMERICAN DREAM:
RUMORS OF ITS DEATH
ARE GREATLY EXAGGERATED
Course Leader: Jim Kneser
7 Thursdays, Oct 8-Nov 19
10-noon
$85
Lecture, Q&A

Since the country’s founding, we have believed in American economic exceptionalism. Each new generation of Americans is expected to enjoy living standards above and beyond those enjoyed by their parents. Is America still the land of economic opportunity and mobility or have the structure and culture of American society changed causing the economic stagnation and immobility that some see? If so, what can be done to reverse current trends? In searching for causes, some point to our vaunted system of public education and declare that it has failed us. On international tests, our K-12 students routinely fall far short of both our expectations and of the scores of students in other developed economies. Has our K-12 system broken down? Are we failing to meet our national educational mission of preparing our young adults to (1) lead productive and prosperous
lives, (2) be responsible law-abiding citizens, and (3) be productive members of the labor force and society? We will consider, as well, the changing nature of the crucial non-school factors– the culture and structure of family life in America–searching for effective policy options. All of these issues will likely be at the heart of the political campaigns of 2016; you’ll be prepared for the debates and discussions to come.

After a career in financial management, Jim Kneser has turned his attention to educating adults about the workings of complicated economic principles in the real world. In the past 17 years he’s taught
courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics, globalization and public policy to over 5,000 participants in over 60 courses.

Academy Facilitators

Our facilitators are enthusiastic volunteers who research and present courses on topics of great interest to them. The materials and opinions they and their guest speakers present are their own and not necessarily those of the Academy for Lifelong Learning.

Bob Adelstein has been taking pictures since he was 12 years old and still owns the box camera that he used back then. In fact, he has kept most of the cameras he has used over the years, some 30 of them. He has processed film, and printed color and black and white pictures in his own darkroom. Moving into today’s world, Bob is now doing digital work and has two film scanners so he can use pictures taken in the past. He has self-publish two of his own books. He is interested in sharing his knowledge with and learning from others.  Bob is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice.

Steven Bernard was a prosecutor for 28 years.  For the past five years he has been a judge on the Colorado Court of Appeals, where he has presided for over five years. He has frequently considered constitutional questions during his career. The Constitution is the document upon which our system of government is based and Steve believes that education about this seminal document is essential to an understanding of our system of government, and to understanding the rights of citizens.

Susan Blake-Smith is an early member of The Academy who spent 25 years living in Mexico City, making her uniquely qualified to teach conversational Spanish.  Susan has a BFA in journalism from SMU and enjoyed a successful career in marketing and sales in the travel industry. She has served on several non-profit boards in Denver and chaired many fundraisers over the years.   She remembers scrambling up the Pyramid of the Sun on grade-school field trips and looks forward to sharing her love of Mexico and its beautiful language.

Kathy Boyer has conducted LIFE STORY workshops for libraries, summer camps, churches, community centers, and with the Academy.  As a child, Kathy developed a love of the personal story as she listened to adults recall the tales of their childhood.  A retired teacher, Kathy works with individuals to record their memories on audio-tape.  As a workshop facilitator, she offers inspiration and ideas to groups of people who want to begin a written collection of their own short stories.

Dr. Mary Schaeffer Conroy is Emeritus Professor at the University of Colorado at Denver. She has focused her professional research on the politics in Late Imperial Russia and health care in Imperial and Soviet Russia. A popular teacher of Russian and East European history at UCD, she has won many teaching awards. Dr. Conroy’s first publications concerned Peter A. Stolypin. Stolypin served as governor of several Russian provinces at the turn of the 19th-20th centuries and, from 1906-1911, served as Minister of Internal Affairs (Imperial Russia’s largest ministry that supervised the police, certified medical and pharmaceutical personnel and institutions, and dealt with national minorities, local government, and peasants and agriculture). Simultaneously, Stolypin served as Chair of the Council of Ministers–a quasi Prime Minister in the government of Tsar Nicholas II. Most famous for his agrarian reforms, which attempted to replace semi-socialistic peasant communes with private farmsteads, Stolypin also sponsored many other reforms. He was the point man in dealing with the Russian Parliament, newly instituted in 1906. A proponent of law and order, he attempted to the crush revolutionaries’ terrorist activities and curb independence movements of the Finns, Poles, Ukrainians, and other minorities. Stolypin was assassinated in September 1911, while attending the opera in Kiev. A pariah in Soviet times, Stolypin is idolized by many post-Soviet politicians, most notably, President Vladimir Putin. In September 2011, the centenary of Stolypin’s assassination, Dr. Conroy was invited to Russia by a wealthy businessman and former Duma member to give 10 lectures at conferences held in various parts of Russia, Lithuania, and Ukraine. In December 2011 she gave a talk at a conference hosted by the Civic Forum in Moscow. In April 2012, Dr. Conroy participated  in a conference in Moscow commemorating the 150th anniversary of Stolypin’s birth. This talk is included in a book published by the current Russian State Duma. In June 2012 Dr. Conroy was invited to the Economic Forum in St. Petersburg. In October/November 2012, Dr. Conroy switched gears to give a paper on Russian-American Pharmaceutical Relations at the Medical University in Grodno, Belarus.

Georgi Contiguglia was the Curator of Decorative and Fine Arts at the Colorado Historical Society before becoming its President and CEO. She has a Master’s Degree in art history and has worked at the Brooklyn Art Museum and the Denver Art Museum.  She recently won the Dana Crawford Award for Excellence in Preservation from Colorado Preservation, Inc.

The Academy’s liaison with the Denver Art Museum, Marty Corren joined the museum as a volunteer in 2006 and serves as an outstanding and popular docent.  She has a special interest and experience in the modern and contemporary collections at the Denver Art Museum.

Patricia Cox has been writing to save her life, practically all her life.  With a B.S. in Education and an M.A. in Guidance and Counseling, she taught for the Denver Public Schools and Cherry Creek Schools while raising three daughters.  She has taught memoir writing for many groups and has recently published a memoir about her late husband, a victim of Alzheimer’s disease–We Keep Our Potato Chips in the Refrigerator.  Patricia is a member of the National League of American Pen Women, Inc.

The Colorado CPR Association was started in 1981 and believes that effective CPR saves over 150,000 lives per year. As a nonprofit American Heart Association Training Center covering Colorado and Wyoming, coordinates trainings for both instructors and those needing certification. Currently there are over 2,000 instructors aligned with Colorado CPR Association. For more information, please go to www.cocprassn.com.

Don Culp originally intended to be a commercial artist. He attended The Art Center College in Los Angeles then, as young men often do, became sidetracked and worked in a steel mill, attempted an unsuccessful career as a popular singer, drove a tourist limousine, managed a Good Humor Ice Cream branch, and was General Manager of The Magic Castle in Holly-wood before spending the next 46 years with Executive Car Leasing in Los Angeles. Don became addicted to recorded opera in 1970 and the passion has never diminished. His other interests include photography, computers, and reading (biographies, U.S. History and early American vaudeville.) After the death of his wife in 2010, he moved to Aurora, Colorado where he lives as quietly as his somewhat gregarious nature allows.

Billie Day lived in Washington, DC for over thirty years.  She was a high school teacher of modern world history and created a course, Global Perspectives, focused on the culture and history of the world since 1500.  In 1986 she received a Fulbright-Hays scholarship to the Netherlands to study the art, history, and culture of that country and has visited there many times since then.  She has a PhD in education from New York University.

Dr. Christopher “Kip” Doran, a graduate of Boston College and Yale Medical School, a Clinical Professor at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. Having authored two mental health textbooks, he has taught throughout the US and in six foreign countries.

After graduating from high school, Anita Fricklas attended Boston University.  Her career included many years as Director of Education at Temple Sinai. She later became the Executive Director of the American Jewish Committee. Most of her work has revolved around diversity, advocacy, and bigotry reduction. As a volunteer she has dedicated many hours at the Lupus Foundation of Colorado and the Arthritis Foundation writing columns about living well with chronic illness and encouraging the Federal delegation to prioritize lupus and arthritis in doling out research dollars. Anita has received many awards for her work. Two that stand out are the Anita Fricklas Award for Excellence in Education being established at Temple Sinai and Mayor Wellington Webb declaring December 6 2002 as Anita Fricklas Day.

Rosalie Goldman, a semi-retired Special Education teacher and a community volunteer, has a lifelong interest in current events and civil and human rights.  She wanted to organize and facilitate this course to offer Academy members this forum to gain information and hear divergent views on contemporary topics.

After 35 years as an educator, Linda Gordon recently retired as a principal. She lived in Mexico City for ten years, serving as director of an English as a Second Language school. She’s excited to work with eager Spanish learners!

Sheila Gutterman and her award-winning colleagues at Gutterman Griffiths PC Family Law combine their unique areas of expertise to offer a range of services, from effective trial strategies to collaboration and mediation, in order to provide cost effective and outstanding representation for the client’s individual needs. They have been included as 2015 Colorado Super Lawyers®, an honor reserved for only five percent of all attorneys in the state, and 2015 Colorado Super Lawyers® Rising Stars, a designation given to fewer than three percent of attorneys in the state. In addition to their continued recognition as Colorado Super Lawyers®, Sheila Gutterman, Diana Powell and Ann Gushurst have also been named as Top 100 Lawyers in Colorado and Top 50 Women Lawyers in Colorado.

Onsite Consulting owner, Scott Henke, has been a consultant for 32 years, working with over 6000 families and businesses in South Denver. He taught classes through Denver Community Schools for 11 years and worked for 13 years as a Technology Coordinator through Denver Public Schools, helping students and teachers learn computers and the Internet.  His company, Onsite Consulting, offers PC consulting, PC and network troubleshooting, repair, virus and spyware solutions, free offsite backup, remote emergency help and many other computer services. The company received the Business of the Year Award as well as recognition as a resource on local news media.  He is always available for free advice via email scott@henke.com

Shellie Hochstadt graduated from the University of Rhode Island with a degree in history, and a minor in political science. She was a divisional merchandise manager for a department store until 1994, when she returned to her core interest and passion for world history. She taught AP World History, AP Government, and economics until her retirement in 2010. She combines her interests in history, travel, and reading into her teaching, where she endeavors to bring a thoughtful global perspective.

Connie Hyde spent her college and graduate days immersed in literature, but, after a final year in the rare book room at Duke University library with 16th century folios, decided that her intellectual life needed more human dynamic. She spent the next several decades practicing commercial real estate law (and raising children, who, according to Connie, taught her more about the psychology of negotiation than all the law books in the world). Recently retired, Connie has returned enthusiastically to her first loves of literature, history, politics, music and art (and, of course, gardening). “I am fascinated by the people and ideas that have shaped our world and the way that literature, music, and art interact with history and politics. The modern world is so complex and perilous that we, as thoughtful adults, have to be alive to the historical currents that brought us to the present.”

Dr. Hiroko Johnson is an art historian specializing in Japanese art history. She received a PhD from the University of Southern California and was a post-doctoral fellow at University of Tokyo in Japan. She specializes in Asian art and brought Japanese culture to her students by taking them on annual study tours to Japan. Currently an Emeritus Professor at San Diego State University, she received the Most Outstanding Faculty Member award in 2011. In San Diego she is on the board of the Japanese Friendship Garden and has co-curated the woodblock prints collection of the San Diego Museum of Art. She has numerous publications in both Japanese and English, including a monograph titled “Western Influences on Japanese Art: the Akita Ranga School and Foreign Books” in which she introduced the West to the Akita Ranga Art school, Japan’s first art school to apply the Western painting techniques in Japan.

Sally Kneser is always ready to learn something new and help teach others. “I love to learn, and it’s so much more fun with friends around.” Sally is a Life Master in bridge and enjoys explaining the basics to others. While volunteering with the Junior League, Sally chaired several committees, including the Facilitators and has volunteered as the “keeper of the files” for several nonprofits.  When not enjoying herself at the bridge table, she attends two book clubs and stops to smell roses in her gardens.

Jim Kneser is in his fourteenth year of leading classes in economics, public policy, and high art music. He has led more than 60 economics and public policy classes with more than 3,500 class members and has facilitated more than fifteen classes in music, focusing on the Germanic tradition from Bach to Mahler and from sonatas to opera. Jim has an undergraduate degree in economics from Ripon College and an MBA in finance from the Wharton School.  He is also a CPA and worked in private equity specializing in mergers, acquisitions, speculative markets, and corporate finance.  Jim enjoys placing current economic and public policy issues in proper historical context, explaining the fundamental economic principles that apply, and allowing class members to draw their own conclusions on the proper course of action. Past participants have consistently praised his classes, emphasizing that he “thrives on questions and discussion” and commenting that he is “One of the finest teachers I have ever seen in a classroom—including the graduate level—brilliantly informed!” and that “In all my years of teaching economics at the college level, I have never seen anyone explain the subject as clearly as Jim does.”

Gloria Kubel received a BA in Education from Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, New York and a MA in Dance from the University of Colorado.  She studied ballet growing up in New York City and studied modern dance with Martha Graham, Hanya Holm, Erick Hawkins, Alwin Nikolais and Murray Louis.  She taught modern dance in Denver for over twenty years and directing a small company of dancers, performed in several Colorado cities.  Gloria created a movement – discussion support group for women after breast cancer and continues to teach Dance – exercise and Tai Chi Movement Meditation classes.

Sara Marsden retired in May 2012 from Adams County Social Services after 20 years as a caseworker. She has developed an interest in foreign policy over a lifetime of travel and living abroad in the Phillipines and Mexico. She served two years in the Peace Corps. and lived on and off in Mexico for five years in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s. Her oldest daughter was born in Mexico City. Both daughters are citizens of Mexico and and the US. She is a Denver native who attended CU Boulder and has Masters degrees from CSU and UCLA. She enjoys the interaction and stimulation that comes through courses at The Academy

Larry Matten wears many hats: teacher, paleobotanist, administrator, lawyer and researcher.  Above all, Larry loves teaching about his favorite subject – paleontology and evolution. He has spent over 55 years studying and researching the fossil record. Previous subjects taught include: Darwin, human evolution, amazing fossils and the stories that they tell, and paleontology.

Robin McNeil began his study of piano at DePauw University at the age of four, taking lessons with Irene Soltas. He has a Bachelor of Music in Perform­ance from Indiana University and a Master of Music in Performance from the University of Illinois. He began his teaching career at the University of Illinois and then went to the University of South Dakota where he was Chairman of the Piano Department.

He has performed more than 300 concerts throughout the United States and has written many musicology book reviews for Choice magazine of the American Library Asso­ciation and Publisher’s Weekly, in addition to being an experienced music critic for newspapers. He is also a published poet, and the Denver composer, David Mullikin, has used his poems for art song texts.

In the past, Robin has been thoroughly involved in arts management as the Executive Director of the Fine Arts Center of Clinton (Illinois), State Treasurer of the Association of Illinois Arts Agencies, and member of the Long Range Planning Committee of the Central Illinois Cultural Affairs Consortium. Robin has been the Executive Director of the Denver Philharmonic Orchestra and has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Denver Philharmonic Orchestra Foundation.

Outside the sphere of music, Robin has raced Alfa Romeo and Ferrari automobiles and flown WW II vintage aircraft. He is a member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Robin now lives with his wife in Littleton where he teaches privately and continues to do research on the French composer Théodore Gouvy. He is President of the Piano Arts Association, and an Honorary Member of the Institut Théodore Gouvy of Hombourg-Haut, France.

Longtime art enthusiast Joanne Mendes has recently retired from a career spent organizing programs in art history in London and at the Denver Art Museum, for which she developed and coordinated adult courses and lecture series for more than a decade. Her passion for art was ignited when she and her petroleum engineer husband Bob moved to England, where she soon put her education degree to good use as co-director of Modern Art Studies, a company associated with the Institute of Contemporary Art. Joanne likes nothing better than to put people in touch with the most knowledgeable art experts available and currently continues to organize art-related education and travel opportunities for the DAM Contemporaries, one of the Denver Art Museum’s support groups.

Dr. Walt Meyer is a retired “technocrat,” having spent 22 years in the weather field of the US Air Force and almost 20 years as a program manager for a defense contractor. Walt and wife Karyl have been married 50 years and have three grown children and four grandchildren. Walt’s interest in the Inquisitions stems from his having taught courses on Islam, the Protestant Reformation, and the Crusades, all of which relate in some way to the various Inquisitions. He discovered in his research on the subject that, like the religious forces covered in his other courses, the Inquisitions leave a long trail of legacies, some of which are still present today.

Walt has a BS in Chemistry from Capital University, a PhD in Atmospheric Science from the University of Washington, and he is a graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces and the Minnesota Management Academy. He has served on many boards and task forces within the Lutheran Church and is a member of the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences, sponsored by the Graduate Theological Union of the University of California at Berkeley. He served as Adjunct Professor of Meteorology at Saint Louis University for one year, and he has taught numerous Bible study classes. Through these experiences, and through the Academy, he has found teaching to be one of his passions.

Dr. Jonathan F. Ormes is a Research Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Denver. He was formerly the Director of Space Sciences at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.  His research career involved studies of the origin and characteristics of the relativistic particles that pervade our galaxy known as cosmic rays.  After retiring from the government in July 2004 and moving back to his home state of Colorado, Jonathan became interested in the problems of population growth and climate change.

Since retirement has unfolded, Sheila Porter’s interest in people and places have taken her to far flung locations and led her to doing psychological evaluations of asylum seekers seeking refuge in the U.S. Both activities have made her look at cultural differences, belief systems, the courage it takes to start a new life in a new place and the pros and cons of assimilation. As a psychologist and the granddaughter of immigrants, the multiple layers of what ‘diversity’ involves continue to engage her interest and provide her with a few answers and many more questions.

Sharon Rouse is a retired art teacher who then enjoyed being a supervisor for art student teachers at Metropolitan State College.  She has taught adult watercolor and sketchbook classes and presented short watercolor workshops.  She uses her sketchbooks and journals to record ideas for future paintings.  Her work has been accepted into various shows and is in private collections.  In addition to her art, she is a docent at the Denver Art Museum.

Lorenz Rychner took up piano and clarinet lessons as a child in his native Switzerland. He combined a career in publishing with a busy performing schedule. After emigrating to Australia he spent 15 years as a full-time musician. In 1985, while in Los Angeles studying orchestration and conducting, he accepted an invitation to head up the music synthesis and electronic orchestration programs at the Grove School of Music. Many published books and articles later, he moved to Colorado in 1996 and was the Editor at Recording magazine (recordingmag.com).

Judy Schwartz is a career teacher and counselor. She taught at Temple Sinai for many years.  She taught English and coached the speech and debate team at Denver’s East High School, taught teachers in the Philippines as a Peace Corps Volunteer from 1997 to 2000, taught and was the counselor at Emerson Street School, the former alternative school for expelled students, taught English in Guadalajara, Mexico, taught English acquisition classes in many Denver locations.  Do you get the picture?  Retired now from almost all of these positions, her time now is devoted to her children and four grandchildren and to hobbies and friends, all of which she loves dearly.

Lorraine Sherry, whom we affectionately call the “Academy Map Maven,” has a double life. Her passion in life has always been music – primarily singing – beginning with her first solo in third grade.  She was selected for Allstate Choir while in high school;  elected president of the Opera Workshop at Vassar;  and has been a member of many choirs, including a Gregorian Chant choir in Poughkeepsie, the Vassar Glee Club and Madrigal Group, the Radcliffe Choral Society, Masterworks Chorale in Boston, Boulder Bach Festival, Saint John’s Episcopal Cathedral chancel choir, and many more.  Although she majored in physics while attending undergraduate and graduate schools, she minored in music and took a one-year graduate course in the music of J.S. Bach at M.I.T. from Klaus Liepmann.   She studied voice with Albert Van Ackere (formerly of Pro Musica, Brussels), Maria Coffey in Boston, and Rebecca Barker in Florida.  She has worked with many of the local musicians and choir directors who will serve as guest presenters in this Academy course.  Lorraine facilitated the “Sacred Music” course at The Academy in 2012.

Ralph Stern has spent the past 44 years reading about religious philosophy, theology, theodicy and comparative religion. In 1985 he entered Hebrew Union College, Jewish Institute of Religion, a liberal school. Following a year of study, he decided that he wanted to intensify his study and transferred to the Jewish Theological Seminary, which is conservative. There he received a master’s in Jewish Philosophy. By the time he left JTS in 1991 to become the executive director of the Allied Jewish Federation here in Denver, he had completed two-thirds of the course work needed for a doctorate. He and his wife Frances, a past president of AJA, have lived in Denver for 22 years.

Before retiring after 30 years of teaching experience, Sandy Stolar taught Spanish at the middle school and high school and several semesters of community college, too. She loves getting people interested in speaking another language and learning about foreign cultures. As a staff developer, Sandy has experience teaching adults. Sandy has traveled extensively in Mexico, Spain, Costa Rica and South America. She looks forward to facilitating the Intermediate 2 Spanish class at the Academy.

Paul Turelli is a retired middle school teacher and administrator from Littleton Public Schools.  Paul studied literary and film criticism as a graduate student in college and also taught literature during his teaching career.  He has a vast interest in literature and history finds Stephen King incredibly talented, even beyond his suspense/fright novels.

Dr. Paulette Wasserstein has always loved sharing “a good read.”  Her career in public education, teaching high school English, afforded her the endless opportunities to open student thinking by way of the printed word.  In the early 1990s after many wonderful years of teaching reading and writing at Cherry Creek High School and adult education at the University of Phoenix departments of Communication and Masters of Education, Paulette was inspired to contribute to education on state and national levels.  With a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership, she was contracted to work as an independent consultant with many school districts and administrators to create challenging curricula and to provide K-12 teacher training to raise literacy levels for students.

Doug Wilke discovered a new passion in retirement. His father had a large collection of old family photos and documents to donate to a hometown museum.  Before disposing of them after his father’s death, Doug taught himself to scan and digitize this collection for TV viewing and web sharing with interested family members.  The project expanded to his wife’s family photos and he is now up to about the year 1950 for both families! It’s not only about preserving his family history, but also learning about his family. Doug is eager to share his computer skills with you.

One of the Academy’s most accredited facilitators, Rear Admiral Richard (Dick) E. Young, has a BA from the University of Michigan and graduated with honors from the United States Navy’s Officer Candidate School, after which he was ordered to the destroyer USS MADDOX (DD731), where he served two tours in several official capacities. After leaving active duty, he obtained his JD from the University of Michigan and was Assistant Editor of the Michigan Law Review.  His years in Denver have been no less impressive.  He practiced law and remained active in the Naval Reserve, as well as in numerous civic and political organizations.  His awards, citations and commendations are literally too many to mention but his greatest pride and pleasure are his wife Lorie, to whom he has been married more than 50 years, and his four grown daughters.