Spring 2015

HISTORY

THE POWER OF MAPS:
SCIENCE, HISTORY AND DISCOVERY
Course Leader:  Lorraine Sherry
Speakers: Various from Rocky Mountain Map Society
6 Thursdays, Feb. 26 -April 2
1-3
$55
Lectures, Exhibits

Find out how maps shaped historical events from the time sailors realized the Earth was not flat, to the point where we will follow our cars’ GPS systems to the ends of the same Earth. Local and international guest speakers and map enthusiasts will share their passions and personal collections of original maps, atlases, scientific instruments used in navigation and exploration, and information about satellite imaging. The traveling exhibit will include an 18th-century map depicting George Washington’s great victories and defeats, a rare map with images of fantastic sea creatures, mermaids and battles at sea; and a demonstration about how early sailors used compasses, sextants, and astrolabes to find their way to ports of call.

Recommended  reading: J.N. Wilford, The Mapmakers, revised, (Alfred A. Knopf), 2000.

Dr. Lorraine Sherry is Secretary/ Webmaster and Director of the Rocky Mountain Map Society (www.RMmaps.org). Her personal collection of antique maps focuses on the geography of Eastern Europe, Lithuania and Russia in the 16th to 19th centuries. Various speakers are members of the Rocky Mountain Map Society,a nonprofit organization dedicated to the study and appreciation of maps and other items of cartographic interest.

THE ROMAN EMPIRE: 900 YEARS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD
Course Leader:  Shellie Hochstadt
4 Wednesdays, April 1-22
10-noon
$35
Lecture, Q&A

Over 900 years, from Republic through Imperial Rome, Roman history shaped Western culture as we know it, but how? This story contains military genius, democratic failure, economic power, gravitas, hedonism, justice and cruelty. What forces changed an insulated republic into a great empire? Explore the dynamic changes in governments, social structures, politics, religion, architecture, and war. The history of Rome is a compelling and enlightening story.

Shellie Hochstadt taught world history, government and economics until her retirement in 2010. She combines her interests in history, travel and reading into her teaching, where she endeavors to bring a thoughtful global perspective.

OUR FIVE BEST & WORST PRESIDENTS … YOU CHOOSE
Course Leader:  Dick Young
7 Wednesdays, Feb. 25-April 8
10-noon
$55
Lecture, Discussion, Q&A

Class members will discuss and vote for the five best and worst presidents. The “winners” in each category will be discussed in the following five sessions. On the last day of class, members will vote again to see if we still feel the same. Listening is welcome just as much as vociferous participation.

Recommended reading: Read up a little on any Presidents you wish to nominate, whether they’re the good ones or the bad ones.

Retired Admiral, lawyer, and political leader, Dick Young has taught courses on Pearl Harbor, the Pacific War, and American history at various Elderhostels and continuing education programs of several universities.

HISTORY OF US-SOVIET CONFLICT
Course Leader:  Dr. Mary Schaeffer Conroy
3 Tuesdays
Feb. 24, March 3, March 10
3 Thursdays
Feb. 26, March 5, March 12
10-noon
$50
Lecture, Q&A

The Cold War was a conflict between antithetical political and economic systems. It emerged during World War II. Prof. Conroy will analyze evolving scholarship on the Cold War, the differences between the political and economic systems of the U. S. and the USSR, and how the Cold War was fueled during World War II. Check the Academy Website for suggested readings, and look forward to up-to-the-minute information.

Recommended Readings: Robert J. McMahon and Thomas G. Paterson, eds. Problems in American Civilization: The Origins of the Cold War, Fourth Edition,  (Houghton Mifflin, 1999). Harvey Klehr, John Earl Haynes, Fridrikh Igorevich Firsov, eds. The Secret World of American Communism,  (Yale University Press), 1995. Harvey Klehr, John Earl Haynes, Fridrikh Igorevich Firsov, eds., The Secret World of American Communism,  (Yale University Press), 1998.

World expert on late imperial Russia, Dr. Mary Schaeffer Conroy has given numerous lectures in the USSR. She has published several books and is an emeritus Professor at the University of Colorado, Denver.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

SUBURBS, SLUMS & GHETTOS: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
IN AMERICA
Course Leader:  Chuck Shannon
5 Tuesdays, March 17-April 14
1-3
$40
Lecture, Discussion

What does community development mean? We will examine the historical framework of city and metropolitan development focusing on programs for low-income communities, and their degrees of success, failure and controversy. Theories of community development have been tested through a complementary, and sometimes competing, mix of programs and initiatives of non-profit organizations, foundations, businesses and civic groups, as well as government. The growth of suburbs and slums (barrios, ghettos) after World War II reveals two divergent paths of development. We will conclude with discussion of community development for selected Denver metro- area neighborhoods using data compiled by the Piton Foundation.

Chuck Shannon has been a division director for DRCOG, a vice president for Mile High United Way, a senior fellow at United Way of America, fellow at the Kennedy School at Harvard University, and trainer with the Asset-Based Community Development Institute at Northwestern University.

MIDDLE EAST & NORTH AFRICA
IN TURMOIL
Course Leader:  Sherma Erholm
Speakers: Various Experts
8 Wednesdays, Feb. 25-April 15
1-3
$65
Lecture, Q&A

For much of the western world, the hopeful “Arab Spring” has seemed to become the “Arab Winter” dominated by fundamentalists. The all-purpose cry of “Islam is the answer” may well be a phrase encapsulating the beliefs or ideals guiding extremists—even some rebels. But was an Islam state the point of the original demonstrations and protests? Crucial questions remain. Guest speakers, experts in their fields, will address vital subjects such as: How individual nations affect and are affected by the conflicts; The right and responsibility of the U.S. and the world to intervene; and Rebels—freedom fighters or extremists. Our class will explore past and present, the intricacies of the people and culture of the Middle East and North Africa, in order to try to understand the conflicts raging in this embattled area.

Retired public school teacher and Academy Board President Sherma Erholm holds a Master’s in Communication Theory and Psychology. As a learning junkie, she has facilitated adult courses in such diverse subjects as futurism, Egypt, Iran, evolution, and the U.N.

CONSTITUTIONAL CRIMINAL LAW
Course Leader: Steven Bernard
8 Thursdays, Feb. 26-April 16
1-3
$65
Lecture

Get a guided tour of a hypothetical murder case. Explore the constitutional and legal concepts involved in criminal law and procedure. Discuss the Fourth Amendment (search and seizure), Fifth Amendment (self-incrimination, due process, double jeopardy), Sixth Amendment (right to counsel), and the Eighth Amendment (cruel and unusual punishment). Learn legal concepts such as conspiracy and attempt, and evidentiary questions, such as hearsay and the use of forensic evidence.

Judge Steven Bernard served as a prosecutor for 28 years and now presides on the Colorado Court of Appeals, getting up-close and personal with the Constitution.

ACADEMY TOWN HALL:
EXPERTS AND CONTROVERSIES
Course Leader:  Rosalie Goldman
Speakers: Various experts
6 Thursdays, Feb. 26-April 2
1-3
$50
Lecture, Discussion

Think again about challenging contemporary issues from local experts, who are well informed and hold opinions on each week’s specific topic:  Separation of church and state, elections and voting rights related to the Fourteenth Amendment, a gender perspective on the Middle East, views on capital punishment, issues in our changing public schools and their impact on Academy members, and hate crimes five years after the passage of the Shepard-Byrd Hate Crimes Prevention Act. All classes will include presentation and discussion. These compelling issues will make for good conversation and are sure to generate new information, ideas and perhaps new realities.

Rosalie Goldman, a semi-retired special education teacher and community volunteer, has a life-long interest in current events, especially civil and human rights.

THE UNDERPINNINGS OF PREJUDICE & HATRED: PSYCHOLOGY & CIRCUMSTANCE
Course Leader:  Sheila Porter
8 Wednesdays, Feb. 25-April 15
10-noon
$65
Lecture, Discussion, Video

Ghandi stated: “An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind.” Use both of your eyes to look deeper than the headlines we are subjected to every time we hear about the most current world crisis. Deconstruct the elements that create and maintain prejudice, discover what it takes to move emotion into action, debunk old myths, explore unintended consequences for both victims and perpetrators, and learn about the positive advances that bode well for our future from both institutions and individuals. We will learn more about our own responses to culturally accepted ideas and beliefs at the beginning of the term. At the end we will have an opportunity to evaluate if what we have learned has changed our ways of reacting.

Required Reading: Zak Ebrahim, The Terrorist’s Son:  A Story of Choice, (Simon & Schuster/ TED) 2014.

Sheila Porter, PhD, has been called the Academy’s patron saint of solemn subjects because of her interest in the “darker” human emotions. She combines an art history degree with over 30 years’ experience as a clinical and forensic psychologist. Sheila chairs the Academy’s Curriculum Committee and volunteers with projects in Cambodia and Africa.

ALL RISE:  HOW OUR COURTS ENSURE EQUAL JUSTICE
Course Leader:  Ellie Greenberg
Speakers: Various judges and attorneys
8 Wednesdays, Feb. 25-April 15
10-noon
$60
Lecture

If what you know about our judicial system depends largely on the media coverage of sensational cases, you are in for an eye-opener. Taught by attorneys and judges with first-hand courtroom experience, this course was designed by the Colorado Bar Association and the Colorado Judicial Institute’s Our Courts program to explain how State and Federal courts actually work—and how judicial procedures help keep the law fair and impartial. Topics include:  The selection and evaluation of federal and state judges, differences between practices followed in criminal and civil cases, bankruptcy basics, divorce and family law, our rapidly changing immigration law, and how Abraham Lincoln’s commitment to equality and liberty transformed our system.

Recommended Reading: http://ourcourtscolorado.org/

Author, teacher, and educator, Dr. Ellie Greenberg developed and led University Without Walls in the 1970s, the start of a 40-year career in providing “access to opportunity” for adults. The Our Courts program has won national awards and has been presented to about 14,500 Coloradans.

ECONOMICS & GLOBAL POLICY

GREAT DECISIONS IN AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
Course Leader:  Sara Marsden
8 Tuesdays, Feb. 24- April 14
10-noon
$90  Book included in class fee.
Reading, Discussion, PBS Videos, Guest speakers

The Great Decisions Discussion Groups are part of a nationwide program developed by the Foreign Policy Association. Each year, thousands of Americans discuss and formulate their opinions on eight vital foreign policy issues. The 2015 topics include: Russia and the Near Abroad, Privacy in the Digital Age, Sectarianism in the Middle East, India Changes Course, US Policy Toward Africa, Syria’s Refugee Crisis, Human Trafficking in the 21st Century, and Brazil’s Metamorphosis. Each 15-page chapter in the Great Decisions Briefing Book places the issues in historical context and provides background, current policies, and alternative options. Discussion questions, annotated reading suggestions, and resources, including websites, are provided. Videos featuring renowned experts in the field provide additional food for thought. Registration is required by Feb. 1, so books may be sent.

Required Reading: Great Decisions Briefing Book, which will be distributed in advance.

Sara Marsden became interested in world affairs through her mother Catherine’s dynamic world view. She studied at the University of Colorado and received Masters degrees from CSU and UCLA. Her interest resulted in a two-year stint in the Peace Corps in the Phillipines.

CRITICAL ECONOMIC ISSUES
Course Leader:  Jim Kneser
4 Tuesdays, April 7-28
10-noon
$60
Lecture, Discussion

Our economic recovery from the 2008 credit contraction and recession has been the slowest of the past half century, causing prolonged human suffering. The Federal Reserve Board estimates that our slower-than-expected recovery has already cost over $17 trillion in foregone national income and has doubled our national debt. The standard fiscal and monetary responses have not worked, causing some to suggest that the causes are structural and secular rather than cyclical. Revisit and update what we learned in class in fall 2013, when we examined Northwestern University Professor Robert Gordon’s provocative theories. New to the hot seat will be Harvard Professor Larry Summers’ contested 21st century version of Alvin Hansen’s secular stagnation theory. Critical Econ devotees and newcomers alike will enjoy the clear and interesting explanations.

After a career in financial management, Jim Kneser has turned his attention to educating adults about the workings of complicated economic principles in the real world. In the past seventeen years he’s taught courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics, globalization and public policy to over 5,000 participants in over 60 courses.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY
& MEDICINE

SPACE TELESCOPES & THE ORIGIN & EVOLUTION OF THE UNIVERSE
Course Leader:  Jim Eraker
6 Tuesdays, March 3-April 14
(SKIP March 24)
1-3
$55
Lecture, Q&A

Since its launch almost 19 years ago, the Hubble space telescope has brought visions of space and better understanding of our universe into our living rooms. About 2018, as Hubble continues, its far infrared successor, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be launched. Learn about the research and engineering that went into developing this giant leap in technology, which will provide 100-fold improvement in our views and allows for the study of the earliest structure and evolution of the visible universe. Lectures include an intro to beginner’s physics and astronomy concepts, and examples and discussion on how the JWST technology will contribute to our knowledge about the origins of the universe, including Big Bang/first light, galaxy formation and solar system development.

Required Reading:  Search for popular articles on your favorite internet search engine with the words, “James Webb Space Telescope.”

Recommended Reading:  Before the Beginning, Martin Rees, (Persus Books) 1997. The James Webb Space Telescope, (Space Science Reviews), 2006.

Jim Eraker received a Ph.D. in Physics at the University of Chicago in experimental astrophysics in 1981, where he studied with astrophysicists Chandrasekhar, Parker, Schramm and Simpson.  He recently completed a 25-year career as a Ball Staff Consultant, where he provided technical leadership to design, build, and test the ultra-cold electronics for the JWST.

CUTTING EDGE MEDICAL RESEARCH FROM THE ANSCHUTZ CAMPUS
Course Leader:  Woody Emlen
Speakers: Various experts from Anschutz Medical Campus
6 Thursdays: Feb. 26 – April 16
(SKIP March 19, April  2)
10 -noon
$50
Lecture, Q&A

Here in Colorado, we are fortunate to have a premier medical research institution in our backyard: Anschutz Medical Campus. Join us as these researchers present some of the exciting research that is happening in our own neighborhood. Talks will cover stem cell and regenerative medicine, updates on cancer research, research on Aging and Exercise, and more. Try your hand at CPR or simulated surgery when the class visits the medical state-of-the-art WELLS Simulation Center.

Dr. Woody Emlen was Professor of Medicine and Immunology at University of Washington and CU Health Sciences Center with a practice in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology. From 2004 to 2011 he co-founded and ran his own Denver-based biotechnology company.

From Anschutz Medical Campus: Dr. Andrew Thorburn, Professor of Cancer Research; Patrick Gaines, Executive Director, Gates Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology; Dr. Christina Aquilante, Associate Professor of Personalized Medicine and Pharmacogenomics; Dr. Tai Lockspeiser, Assistant Professor doing research in Medical Education; Veronica Baiamonte, Coordinator of the WELLS Simulation Center; and Dr. Wendy Kohrt, Professor of Geriatric Medicine.

GHOST PARTICLES:
NEUTRINOS ARE EVERYWHERE
Course Leader: John Anderson
5 Wednesdays, April 1-29
1-3
$50
Lecture, Videos, Reading, Discussion

If neutrinos, a fundamental component of matter, did not exist, the sun would not shine, and we would not be here. While billions of them pass through every square inch of our bodies every second, they are hard to find and study. These elusive particles have been known since 1930, but poorly understood until recently, studied today through exotic experiments in Antarctica, deep gold mines, and the Mediterranean Sea. The science around neutrinos is at the forefront of particle physics research and dark matter. Two Americans earned Nobel Prizes for their work, but others aren’t so revered—one defected and the other disappeared. The final week of class includes guest speaker Prof. Alysia Marino from CU, Boulder.

Required Reading: Ray Jayawardhana, Neutrino Hunters -The Thrilling Chase for a Ghostly Particle to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe (Scientific American/FSG, New York), 2013.

Recommended Reading: Christine Sutton, Spaceship Neutrino, (Cambridge), 1992.

After 30 years in technical sales and support in the computer industry, John Anderson resumed an undergraduate interest in physics and the history of science in retirement and has taught several science based courses at the Academy.

NUTRITION FOR EVERY BODY:
Course Leader: Richard Pflugfelder
6 Tuesdays, March 10-April 14
10-noon
$55
Lecture, Discussion

Recent research breakthoughs make a compelling case for the power of optimal nutrition to reduce the risk of numerous diseases and enhance the quality and length of our lives. But there are many areas of controversy. This course will present data summaries and expert opinion on both sides of major issues. We will cover macronutrients (carbohydrates, fats and proteins) and micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, etc.). The science presented will be clearly explained and illustrated by examples of familiar products.  Many resources for further study will be offered.

Richard Pflugfelder has a Ph.D. in Food Science and a passionate interest in nutrition and related health issues.

CLIMATE CHANGE:
TODAY’S GLOBAL CHALLENGE
Course Leader:  Jonathan Ormes
8 Thursdays, Feb. 26-April 23
(SKIP March 26)
10-noon
$65
Lecture, Q&A, Discussion, Field Trip

This is a repeat and update of last term’s class, guided by our very own physics and astronomy expert. We’ll explore various aspects of this complex and often controversial topic, such as the causes of global warming (some say population and affluence might be underlying factors) and how to mitigate its effects. We will look at the geological record; enjoy images from space; explore the arguments made by skeptics; and learn lessons from our two closest planetary neighbors, Mars and Venus. A highlight will be a visit to the National Ice Core Laboratory at the Denver Federal Center.

Dr. Jonathan Ormes is a Physics Research Professor at DU. He was the Director of Space Sciences at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. His research career involved studies of the origin and characteristics of the relativistic particles that pervade our galaxy.

WHAT’S UP DOC? RELEVANT MEDICAL ISSUES FOR 55+
Course Leaders:  Woody Emlen/
George Ho
Speakers:  Various physicians
6 Wednesdays, March 4-April 22
(SKIP March 11, April 15)
10-noon
$50
Lecture, Q&A

Hear from a different physician specialist each week to explore the effects of aging on the body and for an overview of medical issues relevant to our population. Areas to be covered this semester include:  General Geriatric medical issues, Arthritis, Psychiatry, Dermatology, Cardiology/Exercise, and Ophthalmology. This course is not intended to address individuals’ medical problems or provide specific medical advice, but to cover relevant, interesting and timely topics in the medical field.

Dr. Woody Emlen was Professor of Medicine and Immunology at University of Washington and CU Health Sciences Center with a practice in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.  From 2004 to 2011, he co-founded his own Denver-based biotechnology company.  Now retired from a career in teaching and medical practice, Dr. George Ho, Jr. focused his special expertise on the areas of internal medicine, arthritis treatment and palliative end-of-life care.

Speakers are practicing physicians from the greater Denver area and include Dr. John Scott, Geriatrics; Dr. Meg Lemon, Dermatology; Dr. Joel Goldsmith, Ophthalmology; Dr. Alan Fieger, Psychiatry; Dr. Bob Contiguglia, Nephrology; and Dr. Michael Schiff, Arthritis.

MAKING & SHARING SOUND END-OF-LIFE CHOICES
Course Leader:  Dr. George Ho
7 Wednesdays, March 4-April 22
(SKIP April 15)
1-3
$60-Includes the required class workbook. You must own, share or borrow one to participate.
$50-No workbook
Discussion, Lecture, Writing

We will all die one day, but we need not make a graceless exit. Instead, we can prepare for death in a personalized and unique way, by developing our own sense of what end-of-life can and should look like, and sharing those decisions with our family and friends. We’ll consider the options we have, the choices we face and the wishes we want to pass on. This is not a “how-to” course or a substitute for medical or legal advice. It’s an opportunity to appreciate the nuances of the dying process, to consider the difficulties surrounding end-of-life issues, and to develop new perspectives by sharing our concerns in a safe setting.

Required Reading: End-of-Life Notebook.

Now retired from a career in teaching and medical practice, Dr. George Ho, Jr. focused his special expertise on the areas of internal medicine, arthritis treatment and palliative end-of-life care.

RELIGION

AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY:
1865-PRESENT
Course Leader:  Ted Stainman
5 Thursdays, Feb. 26-March 26
$40
1-3
Lecture, Discussion

This class is a continuation of Fall 2014’s History of American Religion (but you need not have attended to register for this one). We will review religion from 1865 to the present. Issues examined include the rise of health-oriented religious groups, the social gospel, mass immigration of Catholics, Jews and now Moslems, and the religious impact of the ‘50s and ‘60s. We will look into the present-day, post-denominational mega churches, influences of Eastern spirituality, and the rise of women to leadership positions in religious life.

Recommended Reading:  Martin Marty, Pilgrims in their Own Land, (Penguin 1984).

Ted Stainman earned a master’s in Hebrew Letters from the Hebrew Union College, NYC, and attended the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel 1964-65 as a special overseas student. He taught American Religion, at Wesley College after retirement from 23 years as an Air Force chaplain.

LITERATURE & WRITING

POETICS: THE POETRY OF POETRY
Course Leader:  Rex Brown
6 Wednesdays, Feb. 25-April 1
10-noon
$50
Reading, Discussion

I think that I shall never see/A poem lovely as a tree… But what is poetry? Are there “right” and “wrong” interpretations of poems? Does a poem mean whatever a reader wants it to mean? Why are “great” poems (the ones you read in English classes) “great?” Why did the poet Ezra Pound say “poets are the antennae of the race?” Ponder these questions that philosophers, critics, and readers of poetry have asked—ever since Aristotle’s Poetics. Read, discuss, and debate different poetic art works. Bring your sense of humor and communality to this class, which will deepen and broaden your appreciation of this often misunderstood, undervalued, and mistaught form of expression.

After earning advanced degrees in literature, Dr. Rex Brown taught at the University of Iowa, Heidelberg College, and the University of Denver, from which he retired in 2010. He has a lifelong interest in literature, philosophy, art and their intersections in our culture and our lives.

Recommended Reading: Any poetry from any source.

FALLING AWAKE:
A HAIKU WORKSHOP
Course Leaders:  Ginny Hoyle/Art Elser
5 Thursdays, Feb. 26-March 26
1-3
$40
Workshop: Reading, Writing, Informal Lecture, Discussion

Haiku is a poetic form deeply rooted in Japanese culture—but it’s so much more than 5-7-5. Its exquisite simplicity opens us to the bright surprise of now. Read and study the work of haiku masters and consider haiku’s intimate connection to nature and the seasons. Each of us will find our own voice, our own way of appreciating and writing haiku. Come prepared to share work (anonymously), and to read and appreciate the work of others. This is a repeat course with an additional facilitator from Spring 2014.

Required reading: Robert Hass, The Essential Haiku, (The Eco Press), 1994.

Ginny Hoyle’s poems have appeared in literary journals and been featured in major art exhibits. She kept a daily haiku journal from 2000 – 2003. She is a member of Lighthouse Writers Workshop. Art Elser retired after 20 years as an Air Force pilot and 30 as a technical writer. His poetry been published in Owen Wister Review, High Plains Register, Harp Strings Poetry Journal, Emerging Voices, The Avocet, Open Window Review, and A Bird in the Hand: Risk and Flight. His chapbook, We Leave the Safety of the Sea, received the Colorado Authors’ League Poetry award for 2014.

NOVELLAS OF STEPHEN KING: SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION & STAND BY ME
Course Leader:  Paul Turelli
7 Thursdays, Feb. 26-April 16
(SKIP March 19)
1-3
$55
Reading, Video, Discussion

As an American author of contemporary horror, suspense, science fiction, and fantasy, Stephen King’s favorite book-to-movie adaptations include Stand By Me and Shawshank Redemption. Read, discuss and analyze these two novellas from Stephen King’s short fiction collection, Different Seasons. Examine each work’s story line and plot, symbolism, characters and writing style. Each story will culminate with a viewing and discussion of the Academy Award nominated films Stand By Me, (1986) and Shawshank Redemption, (1994).

Reguired Reading: Stephen King, Different Seasons:  Shawshank Redemption, Stand by Me, (Viking Press), 1982.

Paul Turelli, a retired middle school teacher and administrator from Littleton Public Schools has a vast interest in literature and history and finds Stephen King incredibly talented, even beyond his suspense/fright novels.

WRITING YOUR LIFE STORIES
Course Leader:  Kathy Boyer
6 Tuesdays, Feb. 24-March 31
1-3
$50
Interactive Writing Workshop

Whether you’re 19 or 90, you have stories to tell and wisdom to share. Learn how to begin compiling a collection of your life experiences to share with friends and family—or simply to read later at leisure. Spark your memory with innovative and engaging activities designed to bring to mind long-forgotten scenes from your past and to help you start getting them down on paper. Pick up your pen and open a new chapter on your life in the supportive atmosphere of this popular class. Limited to 13 participants. This is a repeat of a Fall 2014 workshop and earlier courses.

Kathy Boyer, a retired teacher, has conducted Life Stories workshops for libraries, summer camps, churches, community centers, and the Academy. She offers inspiration and ideas to people who want to begin a written collection of their own short stories.

WRITE TO SAVE YOUR LIFE
Course Leader:  Patricia Cox
8 Tuesdays, Feb. 24-April 14
10-noon
$65
Interactive Writing Workshop

“Anyone who physically and emotionally outlasts childhood has something to write about forever,” offers author Lou Willett Stanek. You’ll agree once you discover the rich vein of topics in your past and experience the joy of preserving these treasured tales. We’ll share and encourage each other in class and tackle some writing at home. Reading your stories aloud will prove a powerful affirmation, and listening to others as they share theirs is an effective way to improve your own writing. Join this group, capped at 12, to learn how to transform your cherished memories into memoirs.

Recommended reading: Lou Willett Stanek, Writing Your Life (Collins) 1996, and Frank Thomas, How to Write the Story of Your Life (Writers’ Digest Books), 1989.

Patricia Cox has taught writing for the Denver Public Schools and Cherry Creek School District. She has published three books, the most recent is I’m Sorry…What Was the Question?

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN
SHORT STORIES
Course Leader: Dr. Paulette Wasserstein
6 Wednesdays, March 4-April 22
(SKIP March 25, April 8)
1-3
$55
Reading, Discussion

Explore fascinating stories with scintillating participation-friendly discussions. If you love great literature, you will appreciate the artistry that goes into the creation of the short prose found in The Best American Short Stories 2012, edited by Tom Perrotta. Each week, the class examines one or two memorable stories, teasing out the meanings of each story and building a greater under-standing of the short story as an art form. Because the short stories are written by contemporary authors, their subject matter and dilemmas cannot fail to stir great questions and evoke new insights about the world in which we live.

Required Reading: Tom Perrotta, ed., The Best American Short Stories 2012, (Mariner Books) 2012.

Dr. Paulette Wasserstein, career teacher of English and education consultant, loves the exchange of ideas and sharing “a good read.”

MUSIC

DISCOVERING ROSSINI:
LA DONNA DEL LAGO
Course Leaders: Linda Bjelland, Charles Jernigan
3 Thursdays, Feb. 26-March 12
$30
10-noon
Lecture, Discussion, Listening to Music

Everyone knows Rossini as the composer of The Barber of Seville and the William Tell overture, but he wrote 39 operas in all! Some of his little-known works are having a renaissance because of great singers like Juan Diego Flórez and Joyce DiDonato. For the first time in its history, the Metropolitan Opera will broadcast a live performance in movie theaters of Rossini’s La Donna del Lago, based on Sir Walter Scott’s poem The Lady of the Lake. Prepare for the screening on March 14 with a short overview of the history of opera, with emphasis on the Italian opera business in the 19th century, and the influence of Rossini, bel canto, and La Donna del Lago. Learn about the importance of Romanticism in Scott’s poem and the opera, and compare different performances. Opera neophytes and superfans are welcome.

There are no formal plans for class members to attend the performance, but they can see it in several movie theaters in Colorado, including the Greenwood Plaza theatres at 10:55 a.m. on March 14, with a repeat scheduled on March 18 at 6:30 p.m. in most venues.

Linda Bjelland retired from a career in software development for the travel industry, and is now enjoying a second career traveling around the world to see opera. She has seen 13 of Rossini’s operas. Charles Jernigan is a life-long opera fan, and particularly a fan of Rossini and bel canto. He publishes essays and reviews in “Jernigan’s Opera Journal” in collaboration with Colorado’s Opera Pronto, www.operapronto.info.

MORE GREAT VOICES OF OPERA
Course Leader: Don Culp
6 Thursdays, March 19-April 23
10-noon
$50
Lecture, Discussion, Listening to Music

Hear a lot of great singing and enjoy an introduction to a wider range of 20th Century performers, some of whom added realism to the opera stage, faced the challenges of racial or religious discrimination, and used personal charm, determination, and strength of will to overcome all barriers to success. While you may have missed the original Great Voices in Opera class, Caruso through Callas, last semester, you are welcomed and encouraged to start learning about this cultural art form now.

Don Culp was in sales and sales management and also managed The Magic Castle in Hollywood. He has studied singers and the art of singing since 1970.

ALL THAT JAZZ:
GREAT PLAYERS & GREAT RECORDS
Course Leader: Lorenz Rychner
5 Tuesdays, March 31-April 28
1-3
$40
Lecture, Discussion, Listening to Music

Jazz has always owed its vitality to many more Greats than the household names like Armstrong, Goodman, Miller etc. This class profiles influential musicians who played, recorded and wrote in exciting new ways, moving this unique music forward throughout the century of its existence. Come hear and watch players in action, while learning what their music was all about and how their careers intersected. Tapping toes and snapping fingers are welcome!

Lorenz Rychner worked as a professional musician in Australia for 15 years before moving to LA to study orchestration and conducting and head the music synthesis program at the Grove School of Music.

THE BAROQUE PERIOD IN MUSIC
Course Leader: Robin McNeil
10 Tuesdays, Feb. 24-April 28
10-noon
$75
Lecture, Discussion, Listening to Music

The origins of the Baroque Period began with Gioseffo Zarlino, who categorized and formulated major and minor scales. Class lecture topics include early opera, vocal chamber music, the establishment of the Baroque keyboard and orchestral suite, and the rise of instrumental music. Other topics comprise cantata, church music and oratorio, and the great musicianship of Rameau, Bach, Vivaldi, Alessandro Scarlatti, Domenico Scarlatti, Handel and more.

Concert pianist Robin McNeil taught at the University of Illinois and the University of South Dakota, in addition to serving as executive director of the Denver Philharmonic Orchestra.

ART

LITTLE KNOWN TREASURES
IN THE DENVER ARTS SCENE
Course Leaders: Sheila Porter/Bebe Telles
Speakers: Various representatives
8 Tuesdays, March 3-April 21
1-3
$65
Lecture

Join us and be let in on the secrets and talents from the local arts scene. Speakers from various groups will present their efforts to keep the arts alive, fresh, and responsive to the interests of the ever-changing Denver demographic. If we are lucky, a mini performance or two might happen.

The list of topics includes the answers to the following questions:

Do you know:
-Denver has multiple cross-cultural theater groups?
-The Colorado Ballet and the DAM have programs for several special-needs groups?
-How the RiNo (River North) district and its gallery world came into being?
-About the Museo de Las Americas or the theater group Phamaly?
-Denver has a nonprofit group of business leaders that look at the impact of the arts on the economics of the community?

Sheila Porter, PhD, combines an art history degree with over 30 years’ experience as a clinical and forensic psychologist. Sheila chairs the Academy’s Curriculum Committee and volunteers with projects in Cambodia and Africa.

Bebe Telles is a proud native Texan now living in Colorado because she loves the climate. Her husband’s career as a geophysicist for a major oil company gave them the opportunity to live in the Connecticut/NY area, Denver and Lima, Peru. Bebe has found various occupations and volunteer opportunities to satisfy her personally and professionally with every move.

DUTCH MASTERS, PART 2:
UNRIVALED HERITAGE
Course Leader: Billie Day
7 Tuesdays, March 3-April 14
1-3
$60
Video Lectures, Discussion

Holland in the 17th century was home to a remarkable concentration of artistic talent and accomplishment. To this day, these compelling pictures take our breath away–an unrivaled heritage of images of Dutch life that continue to grace many museums. Why are our eyes mesmerized by the glistening stream issuing from the pitcher in Vermeer’s The Milkmaid? How does our understanding deepen when we look at the revealing details of his Woman Holding a Balance? Dutch Masters, Part 2: Unrivaled Heritage, is the second part of a three-course series that features a DVD and lecture about Dutch artists Jan Steen Pieter de Hooch and Johannes Vermeer and Dutch still life and landscape painting. The first week of this course will serve as a review for past and new members.

After living in Washington, DC, for over 30 years and teaching high school modern world history, Dr. Billie Day received a Fullbright-Hays scholarship to the Netherlands to study the art, history, and culture of that country. She has a PhD in education from New York University.

DAM GREAT ART:  BRILLIANT
Course Leader:  Joanne Mendes/Marty Corren
1 Wednesday, Feb. 25
1:30-3:30  Note this class starts later than other classes
$25-includes tour fee, audio & docent introduction
Limited to 28

DRAWING FOR THOSE WHO THINK THEY CAN’T
Course Leader:  Chuck Ceraso
1 Tuesday, Feb. 17
1-3
$35
Studio art: Drawing, Demonstrations
Note: All materials will be provided: drawing pad, markers, charcoal, and pen for you to keep

This hands-on course will take you step-by-step through a process that will unlock your ability to draw anything, accurately.  In a class filled with fun and laughter, you’ll discover a way of seeing that will surprise you in its simplicity.  Your instructor is an artist who has taught thousands over the past 20 years and can still state, “I have never met anyone who can’t learn to draw.”  As he attests, it’s great to travel to new places to be inspired, but even greater to find the endless inspiration of seeing your same old place with new eyes.  If you can sign your name, you have the capacity to draw as well as Rembrandt.

Chuck Ceraso has been teaching at the Denver Art Museum for the past 16 years, and is now teaching at The Art Students League of Denver and at his studio in Lafayette, Colo. He recently completed the book, The Art of Color Seeing.

DAM GREAT ART:
GEMS IN THE DAM COLLECTION
Course Leaders:  Joanne Mendes/Marty Corren
4 Wednesdays, March 4-25
1:30-3:30  Note this class starts later than other classes
$70-group tour, printed materials
Limited to 28
*Parking additional
*Participants must be (or become) DAM members
*Tours take place at DAM

For those who may have missed DAM’s, “Brilliant-Cartier in the 20th Century,” you can purchase an optional ticket for just the first date of DAM Great Art or just enjoy the rest of the four classes as a stand-alone class this semester. Both the DAM curator Donna Pierce, and the conservator, Gina Laurant, join us for the exhibition “Glitterati” to guide us through portraits, furniture and jewelry drawn from the DAM’s world-renowned Spanish Colonial collection. We’ll also see Asian silk robes, Native American beaded adornment, jewelry and clothing in the British portraits, sparkling Pre-Columbian gold, and one of the most exquisite Tibetan art forms, DAM’s unique sand mandala, all are considered artistic “gems” in the collection. Also included is the special exhibition “Miro-The Experience of Seeing” with Master Teacher Danielle Stevens.

If Academy members show as much enthusiasm for this course as in the past, our generous course leaders have agreed to put on a repeat session this term. Get the same four sessions as above (without Brilliant), and just as much beauty and fun. Timing will be determined by the amount of sign-ups.

Art Lovers Extraordinaire: Long-time art enthusiast Joanne Mendes retired from a career spent organizing programs in art history in London and at the DAM. The DAM’s Academy liaison, Marty Corren, joined the museum as a volunteer in 2006 and recently received the Cile Bach Award for outstanding work as a DAM docent.

LANGUAGES

CHATTING IN ESPAÑOL: BEGINNER I
Course Leader:  Susan Blake-Smith
6 Wednesdays, March 4-April 22
(SKIP March 25, April 1)
1-3
$50
Vocabulary, Conversation

Tailored to fit beginners as well as those with “un poquito de” previous Spanish language experience, this class will include the most basic vocabulary, sentence structures and phrases essential for travel and casual conversation. Will you become fluent in six weeks? No, but you will have fun! The Academy’s spring term has three Spanish courses so that you can gain greater confidence in this musical and increasingly important language. Class is limited to 18. Is this class a fit? Llámame at (303) 912-9988.

Required Reading: Participants must buy their own book: Dorothy Richmond, Practice Makes Perfect Spanish Verb Tenses, (McGraw-Hill), 2010. It’s usually under $15

Susan Blake-Smith grew up in Mexico City and enjoys sharing her love of the Mexican language, history and culture. She spent her career in the travel industry and logged many hours as a community volunteer.

CHATTING IN ESPAÑOL: BEGINNER II
Course Leader:  Linda Gordon
6 Wednesdays, Feb. 25-April 22
(SKIP March 11, 18, 25)
1-3
$50
Vocabulary, Conversation

The Beginning/Intermediate class is for those who have taken some Spanish, but want to “brush up” on grammar and vocabulary and keep building conversational skills. Gain greater confidence in this musical and increasingly important language. Participants should be comfortable with the present tense, familiar with the past tenses and ready to sharpen their communication skills through reading, speaking and listening. Class is limited to 14. Is this class a fit? Llámame at (303) 399-8241.

Required Reading: Participants must buy their own book: Dorothy Richmond, Practice Makes Perfect Spanish Verb Tenses, (McGraw-Hill), 2010. It’s usually under $15

An educator for 35 years, Dr. Linda Gordon retired from being a school principal. As the 10- year, former director of an English-as-a-second-language school in Mexico City, she’s excited about working with adults who want to learn.

CHATTING IN ESPAÑOL: INTERMEDIATE
Course Leader: Sandy Stolar
8 Wednesdays, March 4-April 29
(SKIP March 25)
1-3.
$65
Vocabulary, Conversation

¡Continuamos la conversación! The class will be conducted primarily in Spanish, with pauses to look at some important grammar. Themed conversations will build vocabulary and the confidence to speak in complete sentences in real-life situations. Si tú puedes pedir una margarita, describir las cosas que más te gustan, y preguntar como llegar al museo and want to dust it off and trot it out—and have a lot of fun doing it—esta es la clase para ti. Limited to 12 participants. To see if this class is a fit for you llámame at (303) 708-9716. Unlike the other Spanish classes, this one will run for eight weeks.

Required Reading: Participants must buy their own book: Dorothy Richmond, Practice Makes Perfect Spanish Verb Tenses, (McGraw-Hill), 2010. It’s usually under $15

Sandy Stolar taught Spanish for 25 years in middle school, high school and community college. She has traveled extensively in Mexico, Spain and South America.

SKILLS

FINANCIAL LITERACY:
21ST CENTURY SURVIVAL SKILLS
Course Leader: Eileen Sharkey
5 Wednesdays, April 1-April 29
1-3
$45
Lecture, Discussion

Global and personal economic storms are hard to avoid but you can improve your chances of survival. Use current, practical tools to audit your own financial situation and perform exercises to help you improve results. Get the basics, but also delve into advanced money management techniques about the psychology of money, cash flow, inflation, investing and safe withdrawal rates. Evaluate and establish medical and financial directives and communicate your end-of-life plans in case of cognitive decline. Remember what Will Rogers said: “Even though you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.”

Eileen Sharkey, CFP®, has a practical and global view of finance and an easy-to-understand approach to the changing principles of money management. In 2010, Wealth Manager honored her as one of the nation’s 50 most influential women in finance.

TECH TIPS TRAINING
Course Leader: Scott Henke
8 Thursdays, Feb. 26-April 30
(SKIP March 26, April 2)
1-3
$60 or $10/session
-one session free with Academy membership
-non-members $13 each session
Lecture, Demonstration, Q&A

2/26: Computer Basics & How to Buy a New PC, Plus Overview of Semester’s Classes

This is a free class even if you are not signed up for the entire Tech Series. Scott will go over basic computer terminology and troubleshooting your equipment, and talk about when to buy a new computer and when to fix one. Then, he will spend the last 30 minutes highlighting what will be covered in the other classes this semester.

3/5: Beginning with Facebook

How to use Facebook to keep in touch with your friends and family on your computer or smartphone!

3/12: Saving Files and Attachments & Using Dropbox to Share Files

Now where did I put that file? Demystify attachments from emails and downloads. Learn where to put them so you can find them easily. Then, see how Dropbox.com works to share files between other people and even your phone for free.

3/19: Should I buy a Smartphone or Tablet?

There are hundreds of choices when it comes to phones. What features should you look for that fits you and your lifestyle? We will discuss flip phones, iPhones, Samsung and Android-based phones. We will also discuss cell phone company options.

4/9: Using Pandora Music, Skype Webcam and Amazon.com

Bring the outside world into your home easily! Pandora lets you play music from millions of songs for free. Skype lets you see your family and friends with a webcam. Amazon lets you shop hundreds of stores for a single product in seconds.

4/16: Open Question and Answer time: Any Topic, Bring Your Gadget

Bring any question and have Scott answer in lecture format in front of the class. Bring your phone, laptop or gadget, and another teacher will help you with small questions up to 10 minutes in another part of the room!

4/23 I Bought an iPhone.Now What?

The title says it all. You bought it. Now, what can you do with it? Bring your iPhone for this informative class on how to get started with the iPhone and its features!

4/30 I Bought an iPad. Now What?

The title says it all. You bought it. Now, what can you do with it? Bring your iPad for this informative class on how to get started with the iPad and its features!

Onsite Consulting owner, Scott Henke, has been a consultant for 32 years. His company, Onsite Consulting, offers PC consulting, network troubleshooting, repair, virus and spyware solutions, free off-site backup, remote emergency help and many other computer services. The company received the Business of the Year Award.  He is available for free advice via email scott@henke.com

BRIDGE: PLAY OF THE HAND, PART 2
Course Leader: Sally Kneser
9 Tuesdays, March 3-April 28
12:45-3  Note the early start
$95
Lecture, Reading, Q&A, Exercises, Practice Hands

Make the most of the cards you’re dealt—a continuation from Fall 2014. Review techniques covered last fall, and then examine more techniques for playing the cards as described in the second half of the book. Each session will include one hour of lecture, followed by one hour of playing pre-set hands, with numerous opportunities to decide which techniques are the most appropriate and effective. Weekly reading is required. Advanced beginners and intermediate players are welcome. This is NOT a class for NEVER-EVERS.

Required Reading:  Audrey Grant, Play of the Hand in the 21st Century, (American Contract Bridge League), 2007.

Everyone’s favorite bridge instructor, Sally Kneser takes her passion for bridge to the classroom with humor, patience and clarity. She is a member of two book clubs, a grandma and the former Director of The Academy.

TAKE BETTER PHOTOS:
A WORKSHOP FOR ALL WHO TAKE PICTURES
Course Leader:  Bob Adelstein
5 Thursdays, April 2-30
10-noon
$40
Lecture, Discussion, Videos, Participant Pictures

Had a Kodak (or iPhone) moment lately? Take good pictures, from your first look through a viewfinder to the final printed image. Discuss basic theory and technical aspects of photography, and learn how to use a camera properly, tell a story visually, and edit and print pictures so they reflect what you see in your mind’s eye. Participants will take photos prior to the start of class and each week thereafter, which will be gently critiqued.

Recommended Reading:  Jay Dickman and Jay Kinghorn, eds., National Geographic Complete Photography and Perfect Digital Photography (National Geographic) 2011.

Bob Adelstein, a licensed psychotherapist in private practice, has been taking pictures since he was 12 years old and still owns the box camera that he used back then. He is now doing digital work and has two film scanners so he can use pictures taken in the past. He has self-published two of his own books.

FUN FREEBIES!

MINI ONE-DAY UNIVERSITY, REGISTRATION, ROUND-UP
1 Thursday, Jan. 8
10-1
FREE

A great morning outing for you and a friend! Find out more about classes from various course leaders, hear presentations, grab a bite and learn to print your registration form on the computer. NO RSVP necessary.

EBOLA: PREPARING FOR A SUBSTANTIAL NEW CHALLENGE
Back-to-School Lecture
Wonderful Experts
1 Thursday, Feb. 12
1-3
FREE

Is a “new normal” of scary infections upon us? Ebola – the disease, the science, the epidemic and the challenges it presents to the health care system.  Get the facts on how Ebola causes disease, where it comes from, how epidemics are managed, the value of quarantines, updates on Ebola treatment and prevention and understand the deep need for supporting research so that in the future we can prevent these outbreaks before they happen! NO RSVP necessary.

Virologist Dr. Eric Poeschla, formerly of the Mayo Clinic and now Head of the Division of Infectious Diseases at CU’s School of Medicine and epidemiologist Dr. Michelle Barron, Medical Director of Infection, Control and Prevention, at the University of Colorado Hospital.

Academy Facilitators

Our facilitators are enthusiastic volunteers who research and present courses on topics of great interest to them. The materials and opinions they and their guest speakers present are their own and not necessarily those of the Academy for Lifelong Learning.

Bob Adelstein has been taking pictures since he was 12 years old and still owns the box camera that he used back then. In fact, he has kept most of the cameras he has used over the years, some 30 of them. He has processed film, and printed color and black and white pictures in his own darkroom. Moving into today’s world, Bob is now doing digital work and has two film scanners so he can use pictures taken in the past. He has self-publish two of his own books. He is interested in sharing his knowledge with and learning from others.  Bob is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice.

John Anderson worked in technical sales and support in the computer industry for 30 years. Retirement allowed him to resume an undergraduate interest in physics and the history of science. He has facilitated several science classes at the Academy.  He escaped to Colorado 25 years ago after a score of years in the New York/New Jersey area, including seven years on Wall Street. He has a degree in physics from Yale.

Steven Bernard was a prosecutor for 28 years.  For the past five years he has been a judge on the Colorado Court of Appeals, where he has presided for over five years. He has frequently considered constitutional questions during his career. The Constitution is the document upon which our system of government is based and Steve believes that education about this seminal document is essential to an understanding of our system of government, and to understanding the rights of citizens.

Linda Bjelland retired from a career in software development for the travel industry, and is now enjoying a second career traveling around the world to see opera.  She has seen 13 of Rossini’s operas.

Susan Blake-Smith is an early member of The Academy who spent 25 years living in Mexico City, making her uniquely qualified to teach conversational Spanish.  Susan has a BFA in journalism from SMU and enjoyed a successful career in marketing and sales in the travel industry. She has served on several non-profit boards in Denver and chaired many fundraisers over the years.   She remembers scrambling up the Pyramid of the Sun on grade-school field trips and looks forward to sharing her love of Mexico and its beautiful language.

Kathy Boyer has conducted LIFE STORY workshops for libraries, summer camps, churches, community centers, and with the Academy.  As a child, Kathy developed a love of the personal story as she listened to adults recall the tales of their childhood.  A retired teacher, Kathy works with individuals to record their memories on audio-tape.  As a workshop facilitator, she offers inspiration and ideas to groups of people who want to begin a written collection of their own short stories.

Rex Brown has a BA in American Literature from Middlebury College, a Masters in American and British Literature from the University of Iowa, and a Ph.D in Modern Letters from the University of Iowa.  He is the author of Schools of Thought: how the politics of literacy shape thinking in the classroom; It’s Your Fault, an insider’s guide to learning and teaching in city schools; and scores of reports and articles about teaching reading, writing, art, and critical thinking. He has taught at the University of Iowa, Heidelberg College and the University of Denver, from which he retired in 2010.  He has a lifelong interest in literature, philosophy, art, and their intersections in our culture and our everyday lives.

Chuck Ceraso has been teaching at the Denver Art Museum for the past 16 years, and is now teaching at The Art Students League of Denver and at his studio in Lafayette, Colorado. He recently completed the book, The Art of Color Seeing. Ceraso studied art at the University of Notre Dame, and the New Orleans Academy of Fine Art as well as with Henry Hensche at the Cape School of Art. His work is in private and public collections in both this country and abroad. Ceraso is listed in Who’s Who in the West and The Dictionary of International Biography.

Dr. Mary Schaeffer Conroy is Emeritus Professor at the University of Colorado at Denver. She has focused her professional research on the politics in Late Imperial Russia and health care in Imperial and Soviet Russia. A popular teacher of Russian and East European history at UCD, she has won many teaching awards. Dr. Conroy’s first publications concerned Peter A. Stolypin. Stolypin served as governor of several Russian provinces at the turn of the 19th-20th centuries and, from 1906-1911, served as Minister of Internal Affairs (Imperial Russia’s largest ministry that supervised the police, certified medical and pharmaceutical personnel and institutions, and dealt with national minorities, local government, and peasants and agriculture). Simultaneously, Stolypin served as Chair of the Council of Ministers–a quasi Prime Minister in the government of Tsar Nicholas II. Most famous for his agrarian reforms, which attempted to replace semi-socialistic peasant communes with private farmsteads, Stolypin also sponsored many other reforms. He was the point man in dealing with the Russian Parliament, newly instituted in 1906. A proponent of law and order, he attempted to the crush revolutionaries’ terrorist activities and curb independence movements of the Finns, Poles, Ukrainians, and other minorities. Stolypin was assassinated in September 1911, while attending the opera in Kiev. A pariah in Soviet times, Stolypin is idolized by many post-Soviet politicians, most notably, President Vladimir Putin. In September 2011, the centenary of Stolypin’s assassination, Dr. Conroy was invited to Russia by a wealthy businessman and former Duma member to give 10 lectures at conferences held in various parts of Russia, Lithuania, and Ukraine. In December 2011 she gave a talk at a conference hosted by the Civic Forum in Moscow. In April 2012, Dr. Conroy participated  in a conference in Moscow commemorating the 150th anniversary of Stolypin’s birth. This talk is included in a book published by the current Russian State Duma. In June 2012 Dr. Conroy was invited to the Economic Forum in St. Petersburg. In October/November 2012, Dr. Conroy switched gears to give a paper on Russian-American Pharmaceutical Relations at the Medical University in Grodno, Belarus.

The Academy’s liaison with the Denver Art Museum, Marty Corren joined the museum as a volunteer in 2006 and serves as an outstanding and popular docent.  She has a special interest and experience in the modern and contemporary collections at the Denver Art Museum.

Patricia Cox has been writing to save her life, practically all her life.  With a B.S. in Education and an M.A. in Guidance and Counseling, she taught for the Denver Public Schools and Cherry Creek Schools while raising three daughters.  She has taught memoir writing for many groups and has recently published a memoir about her late husband, a victim of Alzheimer’s disease–We Keep Our Potato Chips in the Refrigerator.  Patricia is a member of the National League of American Pen Women, Inc.

Don Culp originally intended to be a commercial artist. He attended The Art Center College in Los Angeles then, as young men often do, became sidetracked and worked in a steel mill, attempted an unsuccessful career as a popular singer, drove a tourist limousine, managed a Good Humor Ice Cream branch, and was General Manager of The Magic Castle in Holly-wood before spending the next 46 years with Executive Car Leasing in Los Angeles. Don became addicted to recorded opera in 1970 and the passion has never diminished. His other interests include photography, computers, and reading (biographies, U.S. History and early American vaudeville.) After the death of his wife in 2010, he moved to Aurora, Colorado where he lives as quietly as his somewhat gregarious nature allows.

Billie Day lived in Washington, DC for over thirty years.  She was a high school teacher of modern world history and created a course, Global Perspectives, focused on the culture and history of the world since 1500.  In 1986 she received a Fulbright-Hays scholarship to the Netherlands to study the art, history, and culture of that country and has visited there many times since then.  She has a PhD in education from New York University.

Art Elser retired after 20 years as an Air Force pilot and 30 as a technical writer. His poetry been published in Owen Wister Review, High Plains Register, Harp Strings Poetry Journal, Emerging Voices, The Avocet, Open Window Review, and A Bird in the Hand: Risk and Flight. His chapbook, We Leave the Safety of the Sea, received the Colorado Authors’ League Poetry award for 2014.

Dr. Woody Emlen is a graduate of Stanford University and the University of California (San Diego) School of Medicine.  He was Professor of Medicine and Immunology at the University of Washington and the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center for almost 20 years, where his practice was in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology (Arthritis) and his research focused on inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.  In the late 1990s, Dr. Emlen left academic medicine to pursue a career in biotechnology, serving as Vice President of Scientific Affairs for Palo Alto-based InterMune Pharmaceuticals.  In 2004 he co-founded his own Denver-based biotechnology company, Taligen Therapeutics, serving as CEO until the Company’s acquisition in 2011.  He currently is retired from medicine but serves on the Boards of several early-stage Biotechnology companies.

Jim Eraker received a Ph.D. in Physics at the University of Chicago in experimental astrophysics in 1981.   While there he studied with some of the seminal figures in 20th century astrophysics, Chandrasekhar, Parker, Schramm and Simpson.  Recently Jim completed a 25 year career as a Ball Staff Consultant where he provided technical leadership to design, build, and test the ultra-cold electronics for the (far-infrared) James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

Sherma Erholm is a retired educator with a Bachelor’s in Speech and Music and a Master’s in Communication Theory and Psychology.  She loves the Academy because she wishes never to stop learning. Sometimes this means leading courses where she reaches out to include experts as speakers in fields of interest to our members. Outside interests include singing, hiking, skiing, snowshoeing. Sherma enjoys traveling to meet other people and learn of their cultures and has recently become involved with service projects in third world countries.

Rosalie Goldman, a semi-retired Special Education teacher and a community volunteer, has a lifelong interest in current events and civil and human rights.  She wanted to organize and facilitate this course to offer Academy members this forum to gain information and hear divergent views on contemporary topics.

After 35 years as an educator, Linda Gordon recently retired as a principal. She lived in Mexico City for ten years, serving as director of an English as a Second Language school. She’s excited to work with eager Spanish learners!

Ellie Greenberg has been interested in the adult life cycle since she developed and led the University Without Walls in the 1970s. Over the last 40 years, she has had the privilege of designing and leading many more programs for adults, such as: PATHWAYS to the Future for 40,000 US WEST non-management employees in 14 states; Project Leadership focused on non-profit board leadership; and MAPP–the Mountain and Plains Partnership-online Masters degree programs for health professionals in underserved areas.  Ms. Greenberg has served on many boards and commissions, and learned politics through the civil rights and women’s movements.   She cares about learners and learning, and enjoys creating “access to opportunity.” She finds it exciting to be able to now share what she has learned with you through The Academy.

Onsite Consulting owner, Scott Henke, has been a consultant for 32 years, working with over 6000 families and businesses in South Denver. He taught classes through Denver Community Schools for 11 years and worked for 13 years as a Technology Coordinator through Denver Public Schools, helping students and teachers learn computers and the Internet.  His company, Onsite Consulting, offers PC consulting, PC and network troubleshooting, repair, virus and spyware solutions, free offsite backup, remote emergency help and many other computer services. The company received the Business of the Year Award as well as recognition as a resource on local news media.  He is always available for free advice via email scott@henke.com

In order to stay engaged in lifelong learning, Dr. George Ho, discovered the Academy through its writing courses during the Spring term 2010.  For 40-plus years, he worked in Rheumatology with an additional subspecialty interest and training in Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Now retired, he welcomes the opportunity to apply that professional knowledge, experience and talent to helping members of the Academy navigate the health care system through information and self-exploration.  Since 2011, he has facilitated the Academy course entitled Making and Sharing Sound End-of-Life Choices which he will continue to provide as long as the demand exists.

Shellie Hochstadt graduated from the University of Rhode Island with a degree in history, and a minor in political science. She was a divisional merchandise manager for a department store until 1994, when she returned to her core interest and passion for world history. She taught AP World History, AP Government, and economics until her retirement in 2010. She combines her interests in history, travel, and reading into her teaching, where she endeavors to bring a thoughtful global perspective.

Ginny Hoyle’s poems have appeared in a handful of journals, including Copper Nickel, MARGIE, Pilgrimage and Wazee. Through collaboration with noted book artist Judy Anderson, her work has been featured in exhibits in New York, San Francisco and Denver. Next up is an installation at Walker Fine Art, Denver, 300 W. 11th Avenue, Denver, opening March 25. (The working title is When We Were Birds.) From 2000 – 2003, she kept a personal journal with entries written in haiku—and fell in love with the form, which teaches practitioners to see the world more sharply, with heightened appreciation.

Charles Jernigan is Emeritus Professor of Comparative World Literature at California State University, Long Beach. For many years he was also the Director of the California State University Study Abroad Program in Florence, Italy. Charles is a life-long opera fan, and particularly a fan of Rossini and bel canto. He publishes on-line essays and reviews in “Jernigan’s Opera Journal” in collaboration with Colorado’s Opera Pronto web site. His essays and reviews are also regularly published, on-line and in print, elsewhere in the U.S. and in Great Britain, Germany and Switzerland. He has seen all 39 of the operas Rossini wrote.

Sally Kneser is always ready to learn something new and help teach others. “I love to learn, and it’s so much more fun with friends around.” Sally is a Life Master in bridge and enjoys explaining the basics to others. While volunteering with the Junior League, Sally chaired several committees, including the Facilitators and has volunteered as the “keeper of the files” for several nonprofits.  When not enjoying herself at the bridge table, she attends two book clubs and stops to smell roses in her gardens.

Jim Kneser is in his fourteenth year of leading classes in economics, public policy, and high art music. He has led more than 60 economics and public policy classes with more than 3,500 class members and has facilitated more than fifteen classes in music, focusing on the Germanic tradition from Bach to Mahler and from sonatas to opera. Jim has an undergraduate degree in economics from Ripon College and an MBA in finance from the Wharton School.  He is also a CPA and worked in private equity specializing in mergers, acquisitions, speculative markets, and corporate finance.  Jim enjoys placing current economic and public policy issues in proper historical context, explaining the fundamental economic principles that apply, and allowing class members to draw their own conclusions on the proper course of action. Past participants have consistently praised his classes, emphasizing that he “thrives on questions and discussion” and commenting that he is “One of the finest teachers I have ever seen in a classroom—including the graduate level—brilliantly informed!” and that “In all my years of teaching economics at the college level, I have never seen anyone explain the subject as clearly as Jim does.”

Sara Marsden retired in May 2012 from Adams County Social Services after 20 years as a caseworker. She has developed an interest in foreign policy over a lifetime of travel and living abroad in the Phillipines and Mexico. She served two years in the Peace Corps. and lived on and off in Mexico for five years in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s. Her oldest daughter was born in Mexico City. Both daughters are citizens of Mexico and and the US. She is a Denver native who attended CU Boulder and has Masters degrees from CSU and UCLA. She enjoys the interaction and stimulation that comes through courses at The Academy

Robin McNeil began his study of piano at DePauw University at the age of four, taking lessons with Irene Soltas. He has a Bachelor of Music in Perform­ance from Indiana University and a Master of Music in Performance from the University of Illinois. He began his teaching career at the University of Illinois and then went to the University of South Dakota where he was Chairman of the Piano Department.

He has performed more than 300 concerts throughout the United States and has written many musicology book reviews for Choice magazine of the American Library Asso­ciation and Publisher’s Weekly, in addition to being an experienced music critic for newspapers. He is also a published poet, and the Denver composer, David Mullikin, has used his poems for art song texts.

In the past, Robin has been thoroughly involved in arts management as the Executive Director of the Fine Arts Center of Clinton (Illinois), State Treasurer of the Association of Illinois Arts Agencies, and member of the Long Range Planning Committee of the Central Illinois Cultural Affairs Consortium. Robin has been the Executive Director of the Denver Philharmonic Orchestra and has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Denver Philharmonic Orchestra Foundation.

Outside the sphere of music, Robin has raced Alfa Romeo and Ferrari automobiles and flown WW II vintage aircraft. He is a member of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Robin now lives with his wife in Littleton where he teaches privately and continues to do research on the French composer Théodore Gouvy. He is President of the Piano Arts Association, and an Honorary Member of the Institut Théodore Gouvy of Hombourg-Haut, France.

Longtime art enthusiast Joanne Mendes has recently retired from a career spent organizing programs in art history in London and at the Denver Art Museum, for which she developed and coordinated adult courses and lecture series for more than a decade. Her passion for art was ignited when she and her petroleum engineer husband Bob moved to England, where she soon put her education degree to good use as co-director of Modern Art Studies, a company associated with the Institute of Contemporary Art. Joanne likes nothing better than to put people in touch with the most knowledgeable art experts available and currently continues to organize art-related education and travel opportunities for the DAM Contemporaries, one of the Denver Art Museum’s support groups.

Dr. Jonathan F. Ormes is a Research Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Denver. He was formerly the Director of Space Sciences at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.  His research career involved studies of the origin and characteristics of the relativistic particles that pervade our galaxy known as cosmic rays.  After retiring from the government in July 2004 and moving back to his home state of Colorado, Jonathan became interested in the problems of population growth and climate change.

Richard Pflugfelder is a retired research scientist with a Ph.D. in Food Science & Technology and B.S. in Biochemistry. He has a passionate interest in nutrition and related health issues. He spent his career in the brewing industry, like his father and grandfather. During 16 years in Coors Brewing Co. R&D, he developed flavored beverages and did research in beer flavor chemistry. Richard’s other passions include music, singing, computing and nature.

Since retirement has unfolded, Sheila Porter’s interest in people and places have taken her to far flung locations and led her to doing psychological evaluations of asylum seekers seeking refuge in the U.S. Both activities have made her look at cultural differences, belief systems, the courage it takes to start a new life in a new place and the pros and cons of assimilation. As a psychologist and the granddaughter of immigrants, the multiple layers of what ‘diversity’ involves continue to engage her interest and provide her with a few answers and many more questions.

Lorenz Rychner took up piano and clarinet lessons as a child in his native Switzerland. He combined a career in publishing with a busy performing schedule. After emigrating to Australia he spent 15 years as a full-time musician. In 1985, while in Los Angeles studying orchestration and conducting, he accepted an invitation to head up the music synthesis and electronic orchestration programs at the Grove School of Music. Many published books and articles later, he moved to Colorado in 1996 and was the Editor at Recording magazine (recordingmag.com).

Chuck Shannon’s “two careers” began with twelve years as a division director for the Denver Regional Council of Governments and concluded with 20-plus years in the United Way system. In his last ten years with United Way, he split his time between serving as a Mile High United Way vice-president and as a senior fellow with the United Way of America (United Way Worldwide). In the latter role, he focused on national initiatives for development of low-income communities, serving part-time as a fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and collaborating with the Asset-Based Community Development Institute at Northwestern University.

Chuck’s post-retirement volunteerism embodies the same positive, community-building approach that he initiated at United Way. As an Arapahoe Library District volunteer, he has engaged immigrants from 62 countries in English conversational circles for the past four years. In addition, he has volunteered with Denver Kids, Inc., which partners with the Denver Public Schools to match students with mentors. Though his Denver Kids commitment was a formal one for the first three years, Chuck is now informally mentoring one student from the program.

Eileen Sharkey’s practical and global view of finance and easy-to-understand approach to the changing principles of money management makes her in demand as a financial educator.  In 2010, Eileen was honored as one of the nation’s 50 most influential women in finance by WealthManagerWeb.com.  Eileen is a Certified Financial Planner™ and has been a partner and principal of the financial planning and investment management firm, Sharkey, Howes & Javer, for 25 years.

Lorraine Sherry hails from the east coast (New York, Massachusetts, Florida).  She has a B.A. in physics from Vassar, three master’s degrees, and a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership & Innovation from the University of Colorado.  She was a Senior Research Associate at RMC Research Corporation in Larimer Square until she retired in 2005.  She has been a member of The Academy since 2006 and has facilitated courses in cartography, music, and historic garden design.  She is a Colorado Master Gardener, has sung with many semi-professional and informal choral societies, and is an avid international traveler.  She is the Secretary/Webmaster and Director of the Rocky Mountain Map Society (www.RMmaps.org).  Her personal collection of antique maps focuses on the geography of Eastern Europe, Lithuania, and Russia in the 15th to 19th centuries.

Ted Stainman graduated from the Hebrew Union College, NYC (1970) with a master’s in Hebrew Letters.  He also has a BA in history from Rutgers University (1964) and attended the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel 1964-65 as a special overseas student.  He taught American Religion, a survey course, at Wesley College, Dover, DE, after retirement from the Air Force 1993.

Before retiring after 30 years of teaching experience, Sandy Stolar taught Spanish at the middle school and high school and several semesters of community college, too. She loves getting people interested in speaking another language and learning about foreign cultures. As a staff developer, Sandy has experience teaching adults. Sandy has traveled extensively in Mexico, Spain, Costa Rica and South America. She looks forward to facilitating the Intermediate 2 Spanish class at the Academy.

Bebe Telles is a proud native Texan now living in Colorado because she loves the climate. Her husband’s career as a geophysicist for a major oil company gave them the opportunity to live in the Connecticut/NY area, Denver and Lima, Peru. Bebe has found various occupations and volunteer opportunities to satisfy her personally and professionally with every move. “I am a perpetual student and feel that I am a good and effective teacher in subjects and areas that I know.”

Paul Turelli is a retired middle school teacher and administrator from Littleton Public Schools.  Paul studied literary and film criticism as a graduate student in college and also taught literature during his teaching career.  He has a vast interest in literature and history finds Stephen King incredibly talented, even beyond his suspense/fright novels.

Dr. Paulette Wasserstein has always loved sharing “a good read.”  Her career in public education, teaching high school English, afforded her the endless opportunities to open student thinking by way of the printed word.  In the early 1990s after many wonderful years of teaching reading and writing at Cherry Creek High School and adult education at the University of Phoenix departments of Communication and Masters of Education, Paulette was inspired to contribute to education on state and national levels.  With a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership, she was contracted to work as an independent consultant with many school districts and administrators to create challenging curricula and to provide K-12 teacher training to raise literacy levels for students.

One of the Academy’s most accredited facilitators, Rear Admiral Richard (Dick) E. Young, has a BA from the University of Michigan and graduated with honors from the United States Navy’s Officer Candidate School, after which he was ordered to the destroyer USS MADDOX (DD731), where he served two tours in several official capacities. After leaving active duty, he obtained his JD from the University of Michigan and was Assistant Editor of the Michigan Law Review.  His years in Denver have been no less impressive.  He practiced law and remained active in the Naval Reserve, as well as in numerous civic and political organizations.  His awards, citations and commendations are literally too many to mention but his greatest pride and pleasure are his wife Lorie, to whom he has been married more than 50 years, and his four grown daughters.